ⓘ Nephrocalcinosis

                                     

ⓘ Nephrocalcinosis

Nephrocalcinosis, once known as Albrights calcinosis after Fuller Albright, is a term originally used to describe deposition of calcium salts in the renal parenchyma due to hyperparathyroidism. The term nephrocalcinosis is used to describe the deposition of both calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate. It may cause acute kidney injury. It is now more commonly used to describe diffuse, fine, renal parenchymal calcification on radiology. It is caused by multiple different conditions and is determined progressive kidney dysfunction. These outlines eventually come together to form a dense mass. During its early stages, nephrocalcinosis is visible on x-ray, and appears as a fine granular mottling over the renal outlines. It is most commonly seen as an incidental finding with medullary sponge kidney on an abdominal x-ray. However, it may be severe enough to cause renal tubular acidosis or even end stage kidney disease, due to disruption of the kidney tissue by the deposited calcium.

                                     
  • Chronic hypercalciuria may lead to impairment of renal function, nephrocalcinosis and chronic kidney disease. Patients with hypercalciuria have kidneys
  • excess calcium in the urine, formation of calcium kidney stones, nephrocalcinosis and chronic kidney failure. Dent s disease is often used to describe
  • with nephropathy. It is characterised by dental abnormalities and nephrocalcinosis The dental abnormalities include hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta
  • Thakker RV Mar 1994 Dent s disease, a renal Fanconi syndrome with nephrocalcinosis and kidney stones, is associated with a microdeletion involving DXS255
  • nephropathy is biopsied, the pathological findings are typical of nephrocalcinosis diffuse tubular injury with calcium phosphate crystal deposition.
  • RA 1964 The blue diaper syndrome: Familial hypercalcemia with nephrocalcinosis and indicanuria A new familial disease, with definition of the metabolic
  • Talbot H. W. Sulkowitch. Metabolic studies and therapy in a case of nephrocalcinosis with rickets and dwarfism. Bulletin of the Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • magnesium wasting with hypomagnesemia and hypercalciuria, resulting in nephrocalcinosis and renal failure. Model organisms have been used in the study of CLDN16
  • excess amounts of calcium in the urine hypercalciuria and kidneys nephrocalcinosis which may lead to kidney stones. In rare occasions, the infant may