ⓘ Cavernous nerves

                                     

ⓘ Cavernous nerves

The cavernous nerves are post-ganglionic parasympathetic nerves that facilitate penile erection and clitoral erection. They arise from cell bodies in the inferior hypogastric plexus where they receive the pre-ganglionic pelvic splanchnic nerves.

In the penis, there are lesser cavernous nerves and a greater cavernous nerve.

                                     
  • sinus may affect isolated nerves or all the nerves traversing through it. The pituitary gland lies between the two paired cavernous sinuses. An abnormally
  • to the erectile tissue of the vestibule, and to the cavernous nerves of the clitoris. The nerves composing this plexus contain, like the vesical, a large
  • Buccal branch of the facial nerve Buccal nerve Cardiac plexus Cavernous nerves Cavernous plexus Celiac ganglia Cervical branch of the facial nerve Cervical
  • The cavernous nerve plexus also called the Walther plexus is situated below and medial to that part of the internal carotid artery which is placed by
  • the penis and urethra. The nerves supplying the corpora cavernosa consist of two sets, the lesser and greater cavernous nerves which arise from the forepart
  • nerves near the tissues being removed. It is commonly applied in radical retropubic prostatectomy where surgeons may visually identify the cavernous nerves
  • various cranial nerves may be damaged, resulting in dysfunction and symptoms of a number of different syndromes. Thrombosis, such as a cavernous sinus thrombosis
  • by filaments from the cavernous plexus of the sympathetic, and communicates with the oculomotor, trochlear, and abducent nerves it gives off a recurrent
  • bulging eyes headaches, and paralysis of the cranial nerves which course through the cavernous sinus. This infection is life - threatening and requires