ⓘ Haftarah

                                     

ⓘ Haftarah

The haftarah or haftorah of the Hebrew Bible that is publicly read in synagogue as part of Jewish religious practice. The Haftarah reading follows the Torah reading on each Sabbath and on Jewish festivals and fast days. Typically, the haftarah is thematically linked to the "parshah" that precedes it. The haftarah is sung in a chant. Related blessings precede and follow the Haftarah reading.

The origin of the Haftarah, the value is lost in history, and several theories have been proposed to explain its role in Jewish practice, suggesting it arose in response to the persecution of the Jews under Antiochus Epiphanes which preceded the Maccabees, in which the Torah reading was prohibited, or that it was "instituted against the Samaritans, who denied the canonicity of the prophets, except Joshua, and later against the Sadducees." Another theory is that it was initiated after an act of harassment or other disaster in which the synagogue, the Torah scrolls were destroyed or damaged - it was forbidden to read the Torah portion of any but a ritual fit a roll of parchment, but there was such a requirement on the reading of the prophets, which was then "framed as a temporary means, and then left." The Talmud mentions that a Haftarah was read in the presence of Rabbi Eliezer Ben Hirkan who lived.70 ad, and by the time Rabb 3rd century was the "scroll of the Haftarot," which is not described further, and in the Christian New Testament several references to recommend this Jewish custom was in place in that era.

                                     
  • the Torah on Shabbat and holiday mornings: this person also reads the haftarah portion from a related section of the Nevi im prophetic books Informally
  • 4: Exodus 12: 37 42 Reading 5: Exodus 12: 43 51 Maftir: Numbers 28: 16 25 Haftarah Joshua 3: 5 7, 5: 2 6: 1, 6: 27 When the first day of Passover falls out on
  • the Jewish liturgy, selections from the books of Nevi im known as the Haftarah are read publicly in the synagogue after the reading of the Torah on each
  • of Yom Kippur. The name Shabbat Shuvah comes from the first word of the Haftarah that is read on that day, a combination of Hosea 14: 2 - 10, Joel 2: 11 - 27
  • English spellings is a cantillation mark that is found in the Torah, Haftarah and other books of the Hebrew Bible. The Hebrew word ג ר ש י ם translates
  • once in Exodus, once in Leviticus, and twice in Numbers and once in the Haftarah for Behaalotecha and for the intermediate Shabbat for Chanukah, in the
  • including T vir and Tebir is a cantillation mark commonly found in the Torah, Haftarah and other Hebrew biblical books. It can be found independently or it can
  • variant English spellings is a cantillation mark found in the Torah, Haftarah and other books of the Hebrew Bible. It is most often found together with
  • Women s Torah Commentary and The Women s Haftarah Commentary: New Insights from Women Rabbis on the 54 Weekly Haftarah Portions, the 5 Megillot Special Shabbatot