ⓘ Margaret, 2nd Lady Nairne

                                     

ⓘ Margaret, 2nd Lady Nairne

Margaret Nairne, 2nd Baroness Nairne, later Countess of Nairne, was a Scottish noblewoman at the turn of the 18th century and active in the Jacobite cause for its duration. Her husband, William Murray, 2nd Lord Nairne, was condemned to death for his role in plans for a Scottish rebellion supported by neighbouring France, Lady Margaret travelled from Edinburgh to London to agitate in person for her husbands reprieve from execution, which was eventually successful.

                                     
  • Margaret Mercer Elphinstone, comtesse de Flahaut, Baroness Keith and Nairne 12 June 1788 11 November 1867 was a Scottish society hostess. Margaret
  • William Murray, 2nd Lord Nairne ca. 1665 3 February 1726 was a Scottish peer and Jacobite who fought in the Rising of 1715, after which he was attainted
  • lordship of Nairne by her eldest daughter Emily Petty - Fitzmaurice, Marchioness of Lansdowne, who became the 8th Lady Nairne see Lord Nairne for further
  • Ann Blair, daughter of Sir William Blair of Kinfauns, second to Margaret Nairne of Muckarsie Robert Carnegie died young Jean Carnegie c. 1645 1679
  • Lady Nairne see the Lord Nairne eldest daughter of the French general and statesman Charles Joseph, comte de Flahaut, and his wife Margaret Nairne
  • Murray of Glenmuir. William Murray, 2nd Lord Nairne 1664 - 3 February 1726 married Margaret Nairne Their daughter Margaret Murray died 28 May 1773 married
  • Earlier Tudors: 1485 1558. ISBN 0 - 19 - 285292 - 2 King James IV of Scotland, R.L. Mackie 1958 Nairne Charles Richard Routh Peter Holmes 2001 Who s
  • to special remainders in the letters patent inherited the Lordship of Nairne in 1837, a title which is now held by the Viscount Mersey. The family seat
  • Gordon, Dean of Caithness William Gordon Margaret Gordon, before 9 November 1457 contracted to marry Nicholas Hay, 2nd Earl of Erroll but for some reason did
  • Elizabeth II and a lady - in - waiting to Princess Margaret from the late 1940s until the latter s death in 2002. By royal permission, Lady Elizabeth spoke on