ⓘ Delaying tactic

                                     

ⓘ Delaying tactic

Delaying tactic is a deliberate action to guide decisions to achieve beneficial outcomes, by delaying a decision, or an occurrence. or by slowing it down to win an advantage. Many governments, and organizations are accused of applying such tactics, some examples of delaying tactics are:

  • Overwhelming: The negotiator provides other parties with too much requests or information to overload them.
  • Selective listening: The negotiator overlooks certain fragments of the other parties argument.
  • Feather ruffling: The negotiator utilizes personal attack to divert the discussion to the involved parties instead of the results.
  • Late objections: The negotiator makes an objection late in the negotiation, to set it back to square one.
  • Logrolling: The negotiator concedes on low-priority items to them.
  • Bogeyman: The negotiator introduces a false threat or warning.
  • Active silence: The negotiator uses silence skillfully to induce a targeted discomfort in the other parties.
  • Phasing: The negotiator offers to phase in or out the requested changes, buying themselves more time.
  • Fragmentation: The negotiator breaks the discussion into minor discussions.
  • Questioning goals: The negotiator debates the value of other parties ultimate goals.
  • Bigger picture: The negotiator makes light of the proposed issue, and turns the focus to a wider discussion.
  • Introducing a new issue: The negotiator introduces a new issue during the negotiation for distraction.
  • Control the Agenda: The negotiator controls the agenda, and the priorities to control what is discussed and when.
  • Divide and conquer: The negotiator creates an internal conflict between other parties who are opposed to them.
  • Ellsberg paradox or also ambiguity aversion: The negotiator uses the human bias toward choosing the option that they know more about, despite of its real merits.
  • Limited Authority, or Missing person tactic: The negotiator declares their limited ability to make a decision.
  • Playing Dumb: The negotiator acts stupid to avoid confrontations.
  • Bluff: The negotiator makes a false claim, as if he has better offers from other parties.
  • Changing the Negotiator: The negotiator is changed to reset the progression made thus far.
  • Empty Promises: The negotiator makes promises that they know they will not keep.