ⓘ I-cell disease

                                     

ⓘ I-cell disease

Inclusion-cell disease, also referred to as mucolipidosis II, is part of the lysosomal storage disease family and results from a defective phosphotransferase. This enzyme transfers phosphate to mannose residues on specific proteins. Mannose-6-phosphate serves as a marker for proteins to be targeted to lysosomes within the cell. Without this marker, proteins are instead secreted outside the cell, which is the default pathway for proteins moving through the Golgi apparatus. Lysosomes cannot function without these proteins, which function as catabolic enzymes for the normal breakdown of substances in various tissues throughout the body. As a result, a buildup of these substances occurs within lysosomes because they cannot be degraded, resulting in the characteristic I-cells, or "inclusion cells" seen microscopically. In addition, the defective lysosomal enzymes normally found only within lysosomes are instead found in high concentrations in the blood, but they remain inactive at blood pH because they require the low lysosomal pH 5 to function.

                                     
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