ⓘ Category:Oral consonants

Alveolar and postalveolar approximants

The voiced alveolar approximant is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents the alveolar and postalveolar approximants is ⟨ ɹ ⟩, a lowercase letter r rotated 180 degrees. The equivalent X-SAMPA symbol is r\. The most common sound represented by the letter r in English is the voiced postalveolar approximant, pronounced a little more back and transcribed more precisely in IPA as ⟨ ɹ̠ ⟩, but ⟨ ɹ ⟩ is often used for convenience in its place. For further ease of typesetting, English phonemic transcriptions might ...

Dental and alveolar ejectives

The alveolar ejective is a type of consonantal sound, usually described as voiceless, being pronounced with a glottalic egressive airstream. In the International Phonetic Alphabet, ejectives are indicated with a "modifier letter apostrophe" ⟨ ⟩, as in this article. A reversed apostrophe is sometimes used to represent light aspiration, as in Armenian linguistics ⟨p t k⟩; this usage is obsolete in the IPA. In other transcription traditions, the apostrophe represents palatalization: ⟨p⟩ = IPA ⟨pʲ⟩. In some Americanist traditions, an apostrophe indicates weak ejection and an exclamation mark s ...

Alveolar ejective affricate

The alveolar ejective affricate is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ⟨ t͡s ⟩.

Dental, alveolar and postalveolar lateral approximants

The voiced alveolar lateral approximant is a type of consonantal sound used in many spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents dental, alveolar, and postalveolar lateral approximants is ⟨ l ⟩, and the equivalent X-SAMPA symbol is l. As a sonorant, lateral approximants are nearly always voiced. Voiceless lateral approximants, /l̥/ are common in Sino-Tibetan languages, but uncommon elsewhere. In such cases, voicing typically starts about halfway through the hold of the consonant. No language is known to contrast such a sound with a voiceless alveolar ...

Alveolar lateral ejective affricate

The alveolar lateral ejective affricate is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ⟨ t͡ɬ ⟩, and in Americanist phonetic notation it is ⟨ƛ’⟩.

Alveolar lateral ejective fricative

The alveolar lateral ejective fricative is a type of consonantal sound, reported in the Northwest Caucasian languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ⟨ ɬ ⟩.

                                     

ⓘ Oral consonants

  • with stop being the generic term oral stop, nasal stop and occlusive being restricted to oral consonants Ladefoged and Maddieson 1996 prefer
  • In phonetics, a stop, also known as a plosive or oral occlusive, is a consonant in which the vocal tract is blocked so that all airflow ceases. The occlusion
  • sockets of the superior teeth. Alveolar consonants may be articulated with the tip of the tongue the apical consonants as in English, or with the flat of
  • the vocal tract. Since the consonant is also oral with no nasal outlet, the airflow is blocked entirely, and the consonant is a stop. Its place of articulation
  • the vocal tract. Since the consonant is also oral with no nasal outlet, the airflow is blocked entirely, and the consonant is a stop. Its place of articulation
  • the vocal tract. Since the consonant is also oral with no nasal outlet, the airflow is blocked entirely, and the consonant is a stop. Its place of articulation
  • the vocal tract. Since the consonant is also oral with no nasal outlet, the airflow is blocked entirely, and the consonant is a stop. Its place of articulation
  • Alveolo - palatal fricative is a class of consonants in some oral languages. The consonants are sibilants, a variety of fricative. Their place of articulation
  • that behave phonologically like single consonants The primary reason for considering them to be single consonants rather than clusters as in English finger
  • from the lungs. Pulmonic consonants make up the majority of consonants in the IPA, as well as in human language. All consonants in the English language
  • the vocal tract. Since the consonant is also oral with no nasal outlet, the airflow is blocked entirely, and the consonant is a stop. Its place of articulation
  • the vocal tract. Since the consonant is also oral with no nasal outlet, the airflow is blocked entirely, and the consonant is a stop. Its place of articulation