ⓘ Strabismus

                                     

ⓘ Strabismus

Strabismus is a condition in which the eyes do not properly align with each other when looking at an object. The eye that is focused on an object can alternate. The condition may be present occasionally or constantly. If present during a large part of childhood, it may result in amblyopia or loss of depth perception. If onset is during adulthood, it is more likely to result in double vision.

Strabismus can occur due to muscle dysfunction, hyperopia, problems in the brain, trauma or infection. Risk factors: premature birth, cerebral palsy and a family history of the disease. Types include esotropia, where the eyes intersect "slant eyes" exotropia where eyes get "lazy eye" or "wall eyes", and hyperopia, where they were vertically aligned. They can also be classified as the problem is present in all directions a person looks comitant or incomitant depends on direction. The diagnosis can be made by observing the light reflected from the face, eyes and, considering that it is not centered on the pupil. Another condition that causes similar symptoms, is a disease of the trigeminal nerve.

Treatment depends on the type of strabismus and the main reason. This may include the use of glasses and possibly surgery. Some types of payments since the beginning of operation. Strabismus occurs in approximately 2% of children. The term comes from the Greek strabismos, which means "to squint". Other terms for the condition include "blink" and "cast the eye". "Wall eyes" was used when the eyes turn away from each other.

                                     
  • The management of strabismus may include the use of drugs or surgery to correct the strabismus Strabismus is a misalignment of the eyes and may also result
  • Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Healio: Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Slack Incorporated. 1964. Retrieved 2019 - 01 - 14
  • PMID 28932129. Surgery Encyclopedia - Eye Muscle Surgery Strabismus Surgery Strabismus com - Strabismus Surgery Parikh, RK Leffler, CT July 2013 Loop suture
  • for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus AAPOS is an academic association of pediatric ophthalmologists and strabismus surgeons. The pediatric ophthalmology
  • Minimally invasive strabismus surgery MISS is a technique in strabismus surgery that uses smaller incisions than the classical surgical approach to correct
  • more of these muscles does not work properly, some form of strabismus may occur. Strabismus is more common in children with disorders that affect the brain
  • Botulinum toxin therapy of strabismus is a medical technique used sometimes in the management of strabismus in which botulinum toxin is injected into
  • Esotropia is a form of strabismus in which one or both eyes turns inward. The condition can be constantly present, or occur intermittently, and can give
  • Strabismus was originally identified as a Drosophila protein involved in planar cell polarity. Flies with mutated strabismus genes have altered development
  • congenital cataract Strabismus sometimes also incorrectly called lazy eye, is a condition in which the eyes are misaligned. Strabismus usually results in