ⓘ Extrapulmonary tuberculosis

                                     

ⓘ Extrapulmonary tuberculosis

Extrapulmonary tuberculosis is tuberculosis within a location in the body other than the lungs. This occurs in 15–20% of active cases, causing other kinds of TB. These are collectively denoted as "extrapulmonary tuberculosis". Extrapulmonary TB occurs more commonly in immunosuppressed persons and young children. In those with HIV, this occurs in more than 50% of cases. Notable extrapulmonary infection sites include the pleura, the central nervous system, the lymphatic system, the genitourinary system, and the bones and joints, among others.

Has spread to the lymph nodes is the most common. Ulcers arising from nearby infected lymph nodes may occur and painless, slow growing and has the appearance of "wash leather".

When it spreads to bones, it is known as "osseous tuberculosis", a form of osteomyelitis. Tuberculosis is present in the human body since ancient times. Potentially more serious, widespread form of TB is called "disseminated tuberculosis", is also known as miliary tuberculosis. Miliary tuberculosis is currently about 10% of extrapulmonary cases.