ⓘ Literary space

                                     

ⓘ Literary space

According to Mieczyslaw Porebski space can be divided into three types, namely, extratextual, intertextual and intratextual. The first is where works of art are stored. It is physical, 3-dimensional and, therefore, can be experienced by readers e.g. libraries. The second type is space only in a metaphorical sense, a set of conventions, of common fields of references for a certain piece of writing. It may refer either to other texts or literary traditions, or both, and as such, intertextual space is an abstract notion. The last space differentiated by Porebski is, intratextual space, is what can be called an intentional space since it is implied and, provoked by the text itself, exists only in the implied readers imagination.

Porebski derived three subspaces from the intratextual space: physical, symbolical and mathematical ones. The physical space is considered to be an intricate structure, not ordered. What is more, it is 3-dimensional to characters and infinite lines of length, etc. can be prolonged as much as one wishes them to. The symbolical type of space is the way in which culture arranges it. It is the most primary type of spatial organisation, and it is so crucial due to its metaphysical and eschatological dimension but only when some additional meanings are endows otherwise semantically neutral space. The mathematical type of space can be divided further into topological and geometrical spaces. The former shows how space is perceived in both cultural and mythological way, having much in common with a symbolical space, the latter uses map features, e.g. distances, symmetries, proportions, etc.