ⓘ Familial eosinophilia

                                     

ⓘ Familial eosinophilia

Familial eosinophilia is a rare congenital disorder characterized by the presence of sustained elevations in blood eosinophil levels that reach ranges diagnostic of eosinophilia or, far more commonly, hypereosinophilia. Although high eosinophil levels are associated with certain diseases and thought to contribute to the tissue destruction found in many other eosinophilia-related diseases, clinical manifestations and tissue destruction related to the eosinophilia in familial eosinophilia is uncommon: this genetic disease typically has a benign phenotype and course compared to other congenital and acquired eosinophilic diseases.

                                     
  • Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome Omenn syndrome Familial eosinophilia Hodgkin lymphoma Hodgkin s disease often elicits severe eosinophilia however, non - Hodgkin lymphoma
  • manifestations and tissue destruction related to the eosinophilia in this disorder are uncommon: familial eosinophilia typically has a benign phenotype compared
  • cardiomyopathy Familial dysautonomia Familial emphysema Familial eosinophilia Familial hyperchylomicronemia Familial hyperlipoproteinemia type I Familial hyperlipoproteinemia
  • Martinique lancehead viper Environment associated hypertension Eosinophilia Eosinophilia myalgia syndrome Eosinophilic cryptitis Eosinophilic cystitis
  • Hypokalemia Hypotonia Exercise intolerance Mastocytosis Peripheral neuropathy Eosinophilia myalgia syndrome Barcoo Fever Herpes Hemochromatosis Delayed onset muscle
  • polymorphonuclear neutrophils 288.2 Genetic anomalies of leukocytes 288.3 Eosinophilia 288.4 Hemophagocytic syndromes 288.5 Decreased white blood cell count
  • with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. For example, patients with clonal eosinophilias due to PDGFRA or PDGFRB fusion genes experience long - term, complete
  • 30 genes can cause Myeloproliferative neoplasms that commonly involve eosinophilia eosinophil - induced organ injury, and possible progression to aggressive
  • eosinophilic myocarditis include primary and secondary eosinophilias or hypereosinophilias. Primary eosinophilias or hypereosinophilias i.e. disorders in which
  • leukocytes Alder anomaly May Hegglin anomaly Pelger Huet anomaly D72.1 Eosinophilia D72.8 Other specified disorders of white blood cells Leukaemoid reaction: