ⓘ Hilsea Barracks

                                     

ⓘ Hilsea Barracks

The site was originally occupied by Gatcombe Manor, a medieval house which was acquired through marriage by Admiral Sir Roger Curtis in the 18th century. The War Office requisitioned the site from Curtis for military purposes in the 1770s. The garrison commanders house, which was rebuilt in 1780, evolved to become the officers mess and survives as a Grade II listed building.

Plan of barracks on the site was first compiled by William Dundas in 1756, in connection with the construction of Hilsea lines designed to protect Portsmouth dockyard from land attack. As planned, the barracks consisted of a number of long wooden huts, arranged around three sides of the parade ground. Construction started in 1780 and barracks built to accommodate several thousand troops, was completed in 1794. In 1854 they were rebuilt on a more permanent basis, for the occupation of the Royal field artillery were added in 1888 military chapel known as "St. Barbaras Garrison Church". Royal field artillery left the site in 1921, when he became the main headquarters and warehouse training for the Royal army ordnance corps. During the Second world war the site was used by the U.S. army. In RAOC moved their regimental depot at Feltham barracks in 1946 and completely vacated the site on 31 March 1962. Buildings that have undergone various improvements and changes over the years, was demolished to make room for the "Gatcombe Park" housing Development in 1965.

                                     
  • name of the Toby Carvery chain which now owns it. Construction of Hilsea Barracks started in 1780. Over the decades they underwent various rebuildings
  • 1921 when the corps moved its headquarters to Hilsea Barracks near Portsmouth. From 1885 Red Barracks also accommodated Artillery College known as Ordnance
  • regimental depot was also moved from Hilsea in 1946, to Feltham Barracks Middlesex in 1955 it too moved to Deepcut. Hilsea which had been used by the US
  • landed at Portsmouth on 18 June 1816 and disbanded on 24 August 1816 at Hilsea Barracks followed by the remaining six companies which landed on 17 December
  • 1939 - Chepstow 1924 - 1994 Church Crookham Deepcut Harrogate 1947 - 1996 Hilsea 1936 - Jersey 1938 - 1940 Taunton 1947 - 1949 Woolwich Worthy Down The
  • England. They arrived at Spithead on 3 February 1809 and were marched to Hilsea Barracks three miles from Portsmouth. Green recounts that their uniforms were
  • Warwickshire Yeomanry Warwick Artillery L 3rd Brigade RA Hilsea L 4th Brigade RA Hilsea C 6th Brigade RA Woolwich 3rd Division Tunbridge Wells
  • Arethusa - class cruiser HMS Penelope. Her father, who had been born in Hilsea Barracks had left the Parachute Regiment and trained as a teacher. Mordaunt
  • hospital, converted to barracks 1694, demolished to make way for expansion of nearby power station in the 1920s. Hilsea Barracks Royal Field Artillery
  • caretaker and then at No3 Training Battalion, Royal Army Ordnance Corps in Hilsea During World War II Ockendon served in the Portsmouth Division of the Home