ⓘ Evisceration (ophthalmology)

                                     

ⓘ Evisceration (ophthalmology)

An evisceration is the removal of the eyes contents, leaving the scleral shell and extraocular muscles intact. The procedure is usually performed to reduce pain or improve cosmesis in a blind eye, as in cases of endophthalmitis unresponsive to antibiotics. An ocular prosthetic can be fitted over the eviscerated eye in order to improve cosmesis.

Either General or local anesthetics may be used during eviscerations, with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agent is administered intravenously.

                                     
  • term may also refer to: Evisceration autotomy ejection of viscera as a defensive action by an animal Evisceration ophthalmology removing the internal
  • of orbital implants after evisceration and enucleation in patients with endophthalmitis Current Opinion in Ophthalmology 21 5 375 9. doi: 10.1097 ICU
  • PMID 12789598. Migliori, ME Oct 2002 Enucleation versus evisceration Current Opinion in Ophthalmology 13 5 298 302. doi: 10.1097 00055735 - 200210000 - 00002
  • This is a list of instruments used in ophthalmology A complete list of ophthalmic instruments can be found below: Akahoshi Combo II Prechopper Glasses
  • eye leaving the eye muscles and remaining orbital contents intact. An evisceration is the removal of the eye s contents, leaving the scleral shell intact
  • prosthesis that replaces an absent natural eye following an enucleation, evisceration or orbital exenteration. The prosthesis fits over an orbital implant
  • eye leaving the eye muscles and remaining orbital contents intact. An evisceration is the removal of the eye s contents, leaving the scleral shell intact
  • patients may also require an urgent surgery pars plana vitrectomy and evisceration may be necessary to remove a severe and intractable infection which could