ⓘ Jalauka

                                     

ⓘ Jalauka

Jalauka was, according to the 12th century Kashmiri chronicle, the Rajatarangini, a king of Kashmir. Jaluka was reputed to have been an active and vigorous king of Kashmir, who expelled certain intrusive foreigners, and conquered the plains as far as Kannauj. Jalauka was hostile towards Buddhism and devoted to the worship of the Hindu god Shiva and the Divine Mothers, in whose honour he and his queen, Isana-devi, erected many temples in places which can be identified.

                                     
  • also buit Shiva temples, and appeased Bhutesha Shiva to obtain his son Jalauka Other scolars have disputed the identification with Ashoka of the Maurya
  • successors Jalauka and Damodara. Kalhana, a Hindu historian, asserted that large number of Buddhist scholars were vanquished in debates with Jalauka s guru
  • sources use it to refer to the Buddha. Romila Thapar equates Jalauka to Kunala, stating that Jalauka is an erroneous spelling caused by a typographical error
  • Dhanvantari is depicted as Vishnu with four hands, holding Shankha, Chakra, Jalauka leech and a pot containing Amrita. He is often shown with a leech in
  • Empire did not long survive Ashoka s death. One of Dasharatha s uncles, Jalauka set up an independent kingdom in Kashmir. According to Taranatha, another
  • century, Ashoka s Son Jalauka was shaivite and was responsible for the destruction of many Buddhist monasteries. The story of Jalauka is essentially legendary
  • and Tivala, son of Kaurwaki, died even earlier than Ashoka. Another son, Jalauka does not have much story behind him. The empire lost many territories
  • was appointed as the governor of Gandhara. The Rajatarangini mentions Jalauka as a son of Ashoka. According to Sri Lankan tradition, Ashoka had a daughter
  • possibly Greco - Bactrians Romila Thapar equates Jalauka to the Mauryan prince Kunala, arguing that Jalauka is an erroneous spelling caused by a typographical