ⓘ List of key works of Carolingian illumination

                                     

ⓘ List of key works of Carolingian illumination

Key works of Carolingian illumination are those Illuminated manuscripts of the Carolingian period which are recognised in art historical scholarship as works of particular artistic significance.

The first work to be considered Carolingian is the Godescalc Evangelistary, which was created for Charlemagne between 781 and 783. Until this point, Merovingian and Insular illumination had continued without a breach. The developers of Carolingian illumination were the so-called "court school of Charlemagne" at the Palace of Aachen, which created the manuscripts of the "Ada School." Contemporary was the "Palace School" which was probably based in the same place, but whose artists were from Byzantium or Byzantine Italy. The codices of this school are also known as the "group of the Vienna Coronation Gospels" after their most outstanding examples. After the death of Charlemagne, the centre of illumination shifted to Rheims, Tours and Metz. Since the Court School dominated in the time of Charlemagne, it was more influential in later times than the works of the Palace School. The high point of Carolingian illumination came to an end in the late ninth century. In late Carolingian times a Franco-Saxon School developed which incorporated forms from insular illumination, before a new epoch began at the end of the tenth century with the development of Ottonian illumination

                                     

1. Bibliography

  • Hans Hollander: "Die Entstehung Europas," in: Belser Stilgeschichte, Studienausgabe, Vol 2, edited by Christoph Wetzel, pp. 153–384. Belser, Stuttgart 1993
  • Kunibert Bering: Kunst des fruhen Mittelalters Kunst–Epochen, Vol. 2. Reclam, Stuttgart 2002. ISBN 3-15-018169-0
  • Ingo F. Walther, Norbert Wolf: Meisterwerke der Buchmalerei. Taschen, Koln. 2005, ISBN 3-8228-4747-X
  • Christoph Stiegemann, Matthias Wemhoff: 799. Kunst und Kultur der Karolingerzeit. Katalog der Ausstellung Paderborn 1999, Verlag Philipp von Zabern, Mainz 1999. ISBN 3-8053-2456-1
  • Florentine Mutherich, Joachim E. Gaehde: Karolingische Buchmalerei. Prestel, Munchen 1979. ISBN 3-7913-0395-3
  • Hermann Fillitz: "Propylaen–Kunstgeschichte," Vol 5: Das Mittelalter 1. Propylaen–Verlag, Berlin 1990. ISBN 3-549-05105-0
  • Peter van den Brink, Sarvenaz Ayooghi Hrsg.: Karl der GroSe – Charlemagne. Karls Kunst. Katalog der Sonderausstellung Karls Kunst vom 20. Juni bis 21. September 2014 im Centre Charlemagne, Aachen. Sandstein, Dresden 2014, ISBN 978-3-95498-093-2 on illumination passim.
                                     
  • Carolingian art comes from the Frankish Empire in the period of roughly 120 years from about 780 to 900 - during the reign of Charlemagne and his immediate
  • unlike in the Carolingian Renaissance to the main liturgical books, with very few secular works being so treated. In contrast to manuscripts of other periods
  • mainly by men, of which the Tara Brooch is the most spectacular. Franco - Saxon is a term for a school of late Carolingian illumination in north - eastern
  • Most of the Carolingian palace was built in the 790s but the works went on until Charlemagne s death in 814. The plans, drawn by Odo of Metz, were part
  • and Carolingian forms. The nearby abbey of St. Vaast Pas - de - Calais also created a number of important works In southwestern France a number of manuscripts
  • closely in the Franco - Saxon school of the 8th to 11th centuries, and less so in other Carolingian schools of illumination where the tendency was to foliate
  • building of the abbey after having killed Remaclus s donkey. List of Carolingian monasteries Carolingian architecture This article makes use of the articles
  • center for book illumination at the time. With its precious cover and the 28 full - page miniatures, this is one of the most important works of book art at
  • shape of a remembered melody. Metz was also an important centre of illumination of Carolingian manuscripts, producing such monuments of Carolingian book