ⓘ Photodisruption

                                     

ⓘ Photodisruption

Photodisruption is a form of minimally invasive surgery used in ophthalmology, utilizing infrared Nd:YAG lasers to form plasma, which then causes acoustic shock waves which then in turn affects tissue. The tissue ruptures as a result of the vapor bubble produced by the laser, the temperature required to produce this effect is between 100 and 305 °C.

Because the infrared laser is invisible to the eye surgeons, as a rule, the companion a helium-neon laser used in combination. However, the eye lens acts as a prism, so that the infrared light is bent at an angle less than red light, the result is chromatic aberration. This means that the area allocated helium-neon laser is not exactly in the area of influence of the ND:YAG laser, and therefore, some surgical lasers have an additional adjustment to compensate.

The first successful use of photodisruption was in 1972, in the event the trabecular meshwork. Photodisruption reached widespread use in the early 1980-ies for the treatment of extracapsular cataract extraction. The method most often used for lithotripsy of urinary stones and treatment capsulotomy the rear of the lens. When used in corneal surgery, picosecond and nanosecond disruptors are used on the lamellae of the corneal stroma, and the method may be preferable as it leaves the epithelium and the arrow, the membrane is intact. It changes the appearance of the curvature of the cornea, which affects the refractive properties of the eye.

                                     
  • the material, limited to the focal point. The process is known as photodisruption Due to the ultra short pulse duration of only a few femtoseconds 1
  • cut to the correction prescription required by the patient using a photodisruption laser - tissue interaction. The method of extraction can be via a LASIK - type