ⓘ List of military units and installations in Oklahoma

                                     

ⓘ List of military units and installations in Oklahoma

The armed forces in the United States have built a number of military installations in the state of Oklahoma. Some of these units remain in operation. A number of military installations in Oklahoma operated before or during the Civil War era.

                                     

1. Army / Army National Guard

  • Fort Sill – Lawton
  • United States Army Field Artillery School
  • 214th Fires Brigade
  • 31st Air Defense Artillery Brigade
  • 75th Fires Brigade
  • United States Army Air Defense Artillery School
  • Henry Post Army Airfield – KFSI
  • McAlester Army Ammunition Plant – McAlester/Savanna
  • Defense Ammunition Center
  • Oklahoma Army National Guard
  • 45th Fires Brigade – Mustang
  • Oklahoma Regional Training Institute – Oklahoma City
  • Hal Muldrow Army Aviation Support Facility – Lexington – KHMY
  • 90th Troop Command – Oklahoma City
  • Camp Gruber Maneuver Training Center – Braggs
  • 45th Infantry Brigade Combat Team – Norman
                                     

2. Air Force / Air Force Reserve / Air National Guard

  • Altus Air Force Base – Altus – KLTS
  • 97th Air Mobility Wing
  • Kegelman Air Force Auxiliary Field – Jet – KCKA
  • 71st Flying Training Wing
  • Tinker Air Force Base – Oklahoma City/Midwest City – KTIK
  • 38th Cyberspace Engineering Group
  • 513th Air Control Group
  • Oklahoma City Air Logistics Complex
  • 10th Flight Test Squadron
  • 507th Air Refueling Wing
  • 72d Air Base Wing
  • 448th Supply Chain Management Wing
  • 552d Air Control Wing
  • 76th Maintenance Wing
  • Vance Air Force Base – Enid – KEND
  • 71st Flying Training Wing
  • Oklahoma Air National Guard
  • 205th Engineering Installation Squadron – Will Rogers ANGB
  • 138th Fighter Wing – Tulsa ANGB
  • 137th Special Operation Wing – Will Rogers ANGB
  • 146th Air Support Operations Squadron – Will Rogers ANGB
  • 125th Weather Flight – Tinker AFB
                                     

3. Marine Corps

  • USMC Artillery Detachment – Fort Sill – All Marine Field Artillerymen – both officer and enlisted – are trained at the United States Army Field Artillery Training Center.
                                     

4. Coast Guard

  • Shore Side Support Detachment Sallisaw – Sallisaw
  • USCGC Muskingum WLR-75402 – River Buoy Tender.
  • Container Inspection Training and Assistance Team at Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center – Oklahoma City
  • Coast Guard Institute – Oklahoma City
                                     

5. Former / closed military installations

  • Naval Air Station Clinton 1942–1969 In Washita County. Trained naval aviators during World War II. The U.S. Navy left the area in 1946. In 1954 the U.S. Air Force took over the site to train bomber pilots and the name was changed to Clinton-Sherman Air Force Base. In 1959 Clinton-Sherman became a bomber base housing B-52 Stratofortresses. The air force vacated the area in 1969. Named after the nearby city of Clinton and the Sherman Iron Works who had set up shop after the navy left to scrap surplus World War II naval aircraft.
  • Camp Radziminski 1858–1859. In Kiowa County. Camp was used by troops from Fort Belknap, Texas as a forward operating base to pursue Kiowa and Comanche raiders. Named after First Lieutenant Charles Radziminski 1805–1858 who served in the Mexican–American War 1846–1848.
  • Fort Arbuckle 1851–1870. In Garvin County. Established to stop raids by Plains Indian tribes on immigrant trains headed west to California and on settlements of Choctaws and Chickasaws in Indian Territory. Named after Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle 1778–1851 who served in the War of 1812 1812–1815.
  • Fort Cobb 1859–1869. In Caddo County. Established to protect relocated Native Americans from raids by the Comanche, Kiowa and Cheyenne. Named after Howell Cobb 1815–1868 who was the 22nd Secretary of the Treasury.
  • Cantonment 1879–1882 In Blaine County. In September 1878 a band of Northern Cheyenne had fled northward from the Cheyenne and Arapaho Reservation, causing panic among the residents of western Kansas and Nebraska. With orders to police the reservation, Colonel Richard Dodge 1827–1895 and four companies of the Twenty-third Infantry from Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, established Cantonment midway between Forts Reno and Supply in March 1879. It was never officially named as cantonment is a term for a temporary military fortification.
  • U.S. Coast Guard LORAN-C Station Boise City 1990–2010 In Cimarron County. Enabled aircraft to determine their position and speed using radio signals. Named for nearby city of Boise City. LORAN station was actually at Felt.
  • Fort McCulloch 1862–1865. In Bryan County. Main Confederate fortification in southern Indian Territory. Named for Confederate Brigadier General Benjamin McCulloch 1811–1862 McCulloch had also served in the Texas Revolution 1835–1836 and the Mexican–American War 1846–1848 where he was a major general with the Texas Militia.
  • Muskogee AAF/Davis Field 1941–1947 As an Air Reserve Base: 1956–1967 Named in honor of Muskogee native Jack Davis, who was killed in action in the South Pacific during World War II, Davis Field was previously known as the Muskogee Army Airfield. Built in 1941 42 by the War Department, the initial runway was constructed by commandeering a straight stretch of U.S. Highway 64. The facility was leased by the federal government in October 1942 to serve as a Ground Air Support Base to nearby Camp Gruber. It was also used as a combat-crew training site for aerial photographic reconnaissance during World War II.
  • Fort Coffee 1834–1838. In LeFlore County. Established to stop the influx of illegal whiskey and other contraband coming into Indian Territory from Arkansas. Named after Brigadier General John Coffee 1772–1833 who served in the War of 1812 1812–1815 and the Creek War 1813–1814.
  • On July 1, 1961, the 577th Strategic Missile Squadron was activated at Altus Air Force Base and established twelve missile silo sites in a 40-mile radius around Altus, each with one Atlas-F nuclear missile. Of the twelve sites, all but one were located in Oklahoma. The squadron inactivated on March 25, 1965, when the Atlas-F was phased out in favor of the Titan II missile. All silo sites were subsequently demilitarized and sold to private owners.
  • Ardmore Air Force Base 1942–1959 In Carter County. Started out as Ardmore Army Air Field during World War II. Trained B-17 Flying Fortress and B-26 Marauder crews and CG-4 glider pilots. The army vacated in 1945 but the air force came back in 1953. From 1953 to 1959 cargo planes were stationed here. C-119 Flying Boxcar, YC-122 Avitruc, C-123 Provider and C-130 Hercules. Named after nearby city of Ardmore.
  • Camp Arbuckle 1850–1851. In McClain County. Established to stop raids by Plains Indian tribes on immigrant trains headed west to California and on settlements of Choctaws and Chickasaws in Indian Territory. Named after Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle 1778–1851 who served in the War of 1812 1812–1815. The site proved unacceptable, however, and was abandoned in 1851. The troops relocated the post approximately 28 miles to the south-southwest 201 degrees heading, True to a position on Wild Horse Creek in present Garvin County.
  • Camp Pike 1862–1865. In Haskell County. Confederate outpost. Named after Confederate Brigadier General Albert Pike 1809–1891. Pike had also served in the Mexican–American War 1846–1848 as a captain.
  • Naval Air Station Norman 1942–1959 In Cleveland County. Used in World War II to train naval aviators. Also had Naval Air Technical Training Center Norman which taught the maintenance on the aircraft. The navy moved out in 1946 but came back in 1952 because of the Korean War. The area was transferred to the University of Oklahoma in 1959. Named after the nearby city of Norman.
  • Fort Davis 1861–1862. In Muskogee County. Was the principal Confederate outpost in northern Indian Territory. Named after Jefferson Davis 1807–1889 who was the President of the Confederate States of America 1861–1865.
  • Fort Supply 1868–1895. In Woodward County. Established as a supply base for General Philip Sheridans winter campaign against the Southern Plains Indians, thus the name Fort Supply.
  • Fort Wayne 1838–1842. In Delaware County. Established to protect a military road connecting frontier fortifications and to ease the fear of Cherokee depredations in Arkansas. Named after Major General Anthony Wayne 1745–1796 who served in the American Revolutionary War 1775–1783.
  • Fort Towson 1824–1865. In Choctaw County. Established as a fortification on the international boundary with Mexico Texas, and as a curb to lawlessness in the region. It was also intended to serve as a buffer between Plains Indians to the west and the Choctaw, who were slated for removal to the area from Mississippi. Named after Major General Nathaniel Towson 1784–1854 who served in the War of 1812 1812–1815 and the Mexican–American War 1846–1848. Confederate Brigadier General Stand Watie surrendered to Union forces at Fort Towson on June 23, 1865. Watie was the last confederate general in the field to surrender.
  • Fort Gibson 1824–1890. In Muskogee County. Established to maintain peace on the frontier of the American West and to protect the southwestern border of the Louisiana Purchase. Named after Major General George Gibson 1775–1861 who served in the War of 1812 1812–1815 and the First Seminole War 1814–1819.
  • Camp Nichols Jun Nov. 1865. In Cimarron County. Established to protect the Cimarron Cut-off of the Santa Fe Trail from marauding parties of Kiowas and Comanches. Named after Captain Charles Nichols of the 1st Regiment California Volunteer Cavalry who served in the Civil War 1861–1865.
  • Old Fort Arbuckle 1833–1834. In Tulsa County. It served as a forward operating base for the First Dragoon Expedition. Named after Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle 1778–1851 who served in the War of 1812 1812–1815.
  • Camp Holmes May-Aug. 1835. In Cleveland County. The outpost was used as a council grounds for talks between the U.S. Government Stokes Commission and Indian tribes from the southern plains. Called Camp Holmes after Major Theophilus Holmes 1804–1880 who served in the Second Seminole War 1835–1842 and the Mexican–American War 1846–1848. During the Civil War Holmes sided with the Confederacy, where he attained the rank of lieutenant general.
  • Frederick Army Airfield 1942–1945 In Tillman County. Trained bomber crews during World War II. Aircraft that were based here for training purposes were the A-20 Havoc, B-17 Flying Fortress, B-24 Liberator, B-25 Mitchell and B-26 Marauder. Named after nearby city of Frederick. Today it is the headquarters for the World War II Airborne Demonstration Team Foundation which maintains two flyable C-47 Skytrain transports.
  • There were 11 prisoner of war base camps, 22 POW branch camps, 3 POW hospitals, 3 enemy alien internment camps and 4 POW cemeteries in Oklahoma during World War II.
  • Fort Washita 1842–1870. In Bryan County. Established to protect the Chickasaw from aggressive Plains Indian tribes and unscrupulous whites, and it also stood guard over the Texas frontier. Named after the Washita River.
  • Fort Reno 1874–1948. In Canadian County. Established to protect the Cheyenne-Arapaho Agency at Darlington following an Indian outbreak that led to the Red River War of 1874. In 1908 the post became a U.S. Army Remount Depot until 1948. Named after Major General Jesse Reno 1823–1862 who served in the Mexican–American War 1846–1848, the Utah War 1857–1858, and the Civil War 1861–1865.


                                     
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