ⓘ ELVIS Procedure

                                     

ⓘ ELVIS Procedure

The ELVIS Procedure is a hybrid endoscopic and laparoscopic operation for evaluation of the colon. ELVIS stands for e ndoscopic/ l aparoscopic vis ualisation. This procedure is utilized for patients in whom a standard colonoscopy was unable to be completed. This is also found in the surgical literature as a "laparoscopic-assisted endoscopy" and has been described since 1992.

Usually this is due to anatomical problems such as redundant sigmoid colon or the transverse colon, which prevents the full advancement of the colonoscope to the cecum. During the procedure the Elvis one proceduralist attempt a standard colonoscopy in the operating room with the patient under anesthesia. At the same time, the surgeon inserts the laparoscopic ports in the abdomen of patients. Usually one or two ports are required. Through one port, the laparoscope is usually introduced through the 12 mm port in the umbilicus and another port is used to introduce laparoscopic instruments, such as grabber. Because colonoscopy is performed laparoscopic instruments are used to set the colon as necessary to facilitate advancement of colonoscope. This is achieved by placing a pressure meter, where the volume of turning or holding the colon in such a way to reduce corners.

The benefit is a more aggressive technique can be used to resect colon polyps or mass: an injury such as perforation, are visualized and repair should be undertaken immediately by laparoscopy.