ⓘ Hyperventilation

                                     

ⓘ Hyperventilation

Hyperventilation occurs when the rate or tidal volume of breathing eliminates more carbon dioxide than the body can produce. This leads to hypocapnia, a reduced concentration of carbon dioxide dissolved in the blood. The body normally attempts to compensate for this homeostatically but if this fails or is overridden, the blood pH will rise, leading to respiratory alkalosis. The symptoms of respiratory alkalosis include: dizziness, tingling in the lips, hands or feet, headache, weakness, fainting and seizures. In extreme cases it may cause carpopedal spasms, a flapping and contraction of the hands and feet.

Factors that may cause or maintain hyperventilation include: physiological stress, anxiety or panic disorder, altitude, head injury, stroke, respiratory diseases such as asthma, pneumonia or hyperventilation syndrome, cardiovascular problems such as pulmonary embolism, anemia, incorrectly calibrated medical respirator adverse reactions to certain drugs. Hyperventilation can also be caused by intentionally to achieve an altered state of consciousness, such as in suffocation, in holotropic breathwork, or in an attempt to prolong breath-hold diving.

                                     
  • Hyperventilation syndrome HVS also known as chronic hyperventilation syndrome CHVS dysfunctional breathing hyperventilation syndrome, cryptotetany
  • Central neurogenic hyperventilation CNH is an abnormal pattern of breathing characterized by deep and rapid breaths at a rate of at least 25 breaths
  • Risk cannot be quantified, but is clearly increased by any level of hyperventilation Freediving blackout can occur on any dive profile: at constant depth
  • Hypocapnia usually results from deep or rapid breathing, known as hyperventilation Hypocapnia is the opposite of hypercapnia. Even when marked, hypocapnia
  • diabetic ketoacidosis DKA but also kidney failure. It is a form of hyperventilation which is any breathing pattern that reduces carbon dioxide in the
  • Dettmar  synthesizer on Hyperventilation Paul Fox  bass guitar on Hyperventilation Tommy Grenas  guitar on Hyperventilation Chris McKay  bass guitar
  • for breathing terms. Some describe tachypnea as any rapid breathing. Hyperventilation is then described as increased ventilation of the alveoli which can
  • or hyperventilation The method purportedly retrains breathing pattern through chronic repetitive breathing exercises to correct hyperventilation that
  • Similarly, some speakers maintain a distinction between hyperpnea and hyperventilation whereby in hyperpnea, the increased breathing rate is desirable as
  • Hyperventilating and variants may refer to: Hyperventilation the act of hyperventilating Hyperventilation syndrome, a medical condition involving hyperventilating
  • If severe, it may cause tetany. Respiratory alkalosis is caused by hyperventilation resulting in a loss of carbon dioxide. Compensatory mechanisms for
  • faintness or nausea, numbness throughout the body, heavy breathing and hyperventilation or loss of body control. Some people also suffer from tunnel vision