ⓘ Punctate inner choroiditis

                                     

ⓘ Punctate inner choroiditis

Punctate inner choroiditis is an inflammatory choroiditis which occurs mainly in young women. Symptoms include blurred vision and scotomata. Yellow lesions are mainly present in the posterior pole and are between 100 and 300 micrometres in size. PIC is one of the so-called White Dot Syndromes. PIC has only been recognised as a distinct condition as recently as 1984 when Watzke identified 10 patients who appeared to make up a distinct group within the White Dot Syndromes.

                                     
  • retinopathy AZOOR Multifocal choroiditis and panuveitis MCP Punctate inner choroiditis PIC Serpiginous choroiditis Specific characteristics regarding
  • condition has also been identified as a common initial symptom of punctate inner choroiditis PIC a rare retinal autoimmune disease believed to be caused
  • chorioretinopathy multifocal choroiditis and panuveitis multiple evanescent white dot syndrome punctate inner choroiditis serpiginous choroiditis acute zonal occult
  • 194 211. Harada E. Clinical study of nonsuppurative choroiditis A report of acute diffuse choroiditis Acta Societatis ophthalmologicae Japonicae, 1926
  • description of a type of partial blindness where vision is missing in the inner half of both the right and left visual field. It is associated with certain
  • epicanthus inversus fold curving in the mediolateral direction, inferior to the inner canthus low nasal bridge, ptosis of the eyelids and telecanthus. Blepharophimosis
  • entropion. Repeated cases of trachoma infection may cause scarring of the inner eyelid, which may cause entropion. In human cases, this condition is most
  • two vertically, with the outer half being described as temporal, and the inner half being described as nasal. Bitemporal hemianopsia can be broken down
  • and - itis inflammation It causes pain, redness, and swelling over the inner aspect of the lower eyelid and epiphora. When nasolacrimal duct obstruction
  • the inner ear and eye tissue. Autoantibodies can be demonstrated in the blood of some patients, and these antibodies have been shown to attack inner ear
  • numerous lymphoid follicles on the tarsal conjunctiva, and sometimes a punctate keratitis are seen. Allergic conjunctivitis is inflammation of the conjunctiva
  • condition, usually congenital, which causes a nonprogressive thinning of the inner surface of the cornea, while the curvature of the anterior surface remains