ⓘ Occipital nerve stimulation

                                     

ⓘ Occipital nerve stimulation

Occipital nerve stimulation, also called peripheral nerve stimulation of the occipital nerves, is used to treat chronic migraine patients who have failed to respond to pharmaceutical treatments.

Treatment involves applying weak electrical pulses to stimulate the great occipital nerve and lesser occipital nerve, which are part of the peripheral nervous system and located in the back of the head just above the neck.

Electrical impulses are generated by a small device called a neurostimulator – similar to an artificial cardiac pacemaker which is implanted in the buttocks, chest, lower abdomen, under the shoulder blade or under the collarbone. Electricity is delivered to the great occipital nerve and lesser occipital nerve by small metal electrodes which are located on the thin wire and implanted under the skin. The intensity of the electric pulses can be adjusted using a small remote control.