ⓘ Toxoplasmic chorioretinitis

                                     

ⓘ Toxoplasmic chorioretinitis

Toxoplasma chorioretinitis, more simply known as ocular toxoplasmosis, is possibly the most common cause of infections in the back of the eye worldwide. The causitive agent is Toxoplasma gondii, and in the United States, most cases are acquired congenitally. The most common symptom is decreased visual acuity in one eye. The diagnosis is made by examination of the eye, using ophthalmoscopy. Sometimes serologic testing is used to rule out the disease, but due to high rates of false positives, serologies are not diagnostic of toxoplasmic retinitis.

If vision is not compromised, treatment may not be required. When vision is affected or threatened, treatment consists of pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and folinic acid for 4-6 weeks. Prednisolone is sometimes used to reduce inflammation.

                                     
  • presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome syphilis toxocariasis toxoplasmic chorioretinitis tuberculosis Zika fever Systemic disorders that can be associated
  • affect T. gondii transmission and increase risk of infection. Toxoplasmic chorioretinitis TORCH infection Pyrimethamine Parasites Toxoplasmosis Toxoplasma