ⓘ Exotropia

                                     

ⓘ Exotropia

Exotropia is a form of strabismus where the eyes are deviated outward. It is the opposite of esotropia and usually involves more severe axis deviation than exophoria. People with exotropia often experience crossed diplopia. Intermittent exotropia is a fairly common condition. "Sensory exotropia" occurs in the presence of poor vision. Infantile exotropia is seen during the first year of life, and is less common than "essential exotropia" which usually becomes apparent several years later.

The ability of the brain to see three-dimensional objects depends on proper alignment of the eyes. When both eyes are properly aligned and aimed at the same target, the visual part of the brain fuses the forms into one image. When one eye turns inward, outwards, upwards or downwards, two different images are transmitted to the brain. This causes loss of depth perception and binocular vision. Also, reportedly, some people can "control" their affected eye. The term comes from the Greek Exo-means "outside" and trope means "a turn."

                                     
  • The axis deviation in exophoria is usually mild compared with that of exotropia Exophoria can be caused by several factors, which include: Refractive
  • the light lands on the cornea, the examiner can detect if there is an exotropia abnormal eye is turned out esotropia abnormal eye is turned in hypertropia
  • Types include esotropia, where the eyes are crossed cross eyed exotropia where the eyes diverge lazy eyed or wall eyed and hypertropia
  • anisometropia may be one of the risk factors for developing consecutive exotropia and poor binocular function may be a risk factor for anisometropia to
  • 236 8. PMID 2795412. Folk ER, Miller MT, Chapman L 1983 Consecutive exotropia following surgery Br J Ophthalmol. 67 8 546 8. doi: 10.1136 bjo.67
  • Field Expansion for Homonymous Hemianopia by Optically Induced Peripheral Exotropia Optometry and Vision Science, Vol. 77, No. 9, September 2000 Bowers A
  • affected individual a cross - eyed appearance. It is the opposite of exotropia and usually involves more severe axis deviation than esophoria. Esotropia
  • component of childhood strabismus, particularly infantile esotropia and exotropia Because true hyperinnervation is not usually present, this phenomenon
  • with or without esotropia Type II: Limited adduction with or without exotropia Type III: Limitation of both abduction and adduction and any form of horizontal