ⓘ Renal tubular acidosis

                                     

ⓘ Renal tubular acidosis

Renal tubular acidosis is a medical condition that involves an accumulation of acid in the body due to a failure of the kidneys to appropriately acidify the urine. In renal physiology, when blood is filtered by the kidney, the filtrate passes through the tubules of the nephron, allowing for exchange of salts, acid equivalents, and other solutes before it drains into the bladder as urine. The metabolic acidosis that results from RTA may be caused either by failure to reabsorb sufficient bicarbonate ions from the filtrate in the early portion of the nephron or by insufficient secretion of hydrogen ions into the latter portions of the nephron. Although a metabolic acidosis also occurs in those with chronic kidney disease, the term RTA is reserved for individuals with poor urinary acidification in otherwise well-functioning kidneys. Several different types of RTA exist, which all have different syndromes and different causes. RTA is usually an incidental finding based on routine blood draws that show abnormal results. Clinically, patients may present with vague symptoms such as dehydration, mental status changes, or delayed growth in adolescents.

The word acidosis means the tendency for an accident to cause an excess of acid, which lowers pH of blood. When blood pH below the normal 7.35 is called acidemia. Metabolic acidosis caused by an accident is a normal anion gap acidosis.

                                     
  • Distal renal tubular acidosis dRTA is the classical form of RTA, being the first described. Distal RTA is characterized by a failure of acid secretion
  • Proximal renal tubular acidosis pRTA or type 2 renal tubular acidosis RTA is a type of RTA caused by a failure of the proximal tubular cells to reabsorb
  • Chronic laxative abuse Renal causes Proximal renal tubular acidosis with failure of HCO 3 resorption Distal renal tubular acidosis with failure of H secretion
  • the renal tubule. This results in disruptions of renal reabsorption. Examples of these disorders include Iminoglycinuria, renal tubular acidosis and Gitelman
  • acidosis is diarrhea with a renal tubular acidosis being a distant second. The differential diagnosis of normal anion gap acidosis is relatively short when
  • diversion of urine into gut loops Renal base loss acid retention: Proximal renal tubular acidosis Distal renal tubular acidosis Hyperalimentation Addison disease
  • Renal tubular acidosis distal, autosomal dominant Renal tubular acidosis distal, autosomal recessive Renal tubular acidosis distal, type 3 Renal tubular
  • ability to excrete acid via the kidneys, such as either renal tubular acidosis or the acidosis of kidney failure, which is associated with an accumulation
  • complications. The loss of bicarbonate results in type 2 or proximal renal tubular acidosis The loss of phosphate results in the bone diseases rickets and
  • can be considered a cause of Fanconi syndrome bicarbonaturia, renal tubular acidosis potassium loss and sodium loss Because oculocerebrorenal syndrome
  • cause of type 4 renal tubular acidosis sometimes referred to as hyperkalemic RTA or tubular hyperkalemia. However, the acidosis if present, is often
  • Lightwood Albright syndrome is a form of renal tubular acidosis It is also known as Lightwood syndrome. It is named for Reginald Cyril Lightwood and Fuller