ⓘ Transneuronal degeneration

                                     

ⓘ Transneuronal degeneration

Transneuronal degeneration is the death of neurons resulting from the disruption of input from or output to other nearby neurons. It is an active excitotoxic process when a neuron is overstimulated by a neurotransmitter causing the dysfunction of that neuron which drives neighboring neurons into metabolic deficit, resulting in rapid, widespread loss of neurons. This can be either anterograde or retrograde, indicating the direction of the degeneration relative to the original site of damage. There are varying causes for transneuronal degeneration such as brain lesions, disconnection syndromes, respiratory chain deficient neuron interaction, and lobectomies. Although there are different causes, transneuronal degeneration generally results in the same effects to varying degrees. Transneuronal degeneration is thought to be linked to a number of diseases, most notably Huntingtons disease and Alzheimers disease, and researchers recently have been performing experiments with monkeys and rats, monitoring lesions in different parts of the body to study more closely how exactly the process works.

                                     
  • across multiple synapses. Two tracer viruses which replicate and spread transneuronal transsynaptic are the Herpes simplex virus type1 HSV and the Rhabdoviruses
  • cortex and the arcuate premotor area: An analysis employing retrograde transneuronal transport of WGA - HRP The Journal of Comparative Neurology. 288 4