ⓘ Ōkura Bakufu

                                     

ⓘ Ōkura Bakufu

Ōkura Bakufu is the name given in Japan to the first government of the shōgun Minamoto no Yoritomo. The name is that of the location in Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, where Yoritomos palace used to stand. Ōkura is defined as the area between the Tsurugaoka Hachiman-gū, Asaina Pass, the Namerigawa and the Zen temple of Zuisen-ji. Yoritomos palace complex extended approximately from the Mutsuura Kaidō to the site of his tomb, and from the Nishi Mikado River to the Higashi Mikado River. A black stone stele marks the center of the area where Yoritomos government offices used to stand and carries the following words:

820 years ago, in 1180, Minamoto no Yoritomo built his house here. Consolidated his power, he rules of this house, and his government therefore called ōkura Bakufu. He was succeeded by his sons the ripples, ridges, and Sanetomo, and this place remained the seat of government for 46 years until 1225, when his wife HOJO Masako died. Then he was transferred to Utsunomiya, Tsuji 宇津宮辻. Erected in March 1917, the kamakura-Machi Seinendan

In 1213, and when WADA yoshimori rebelled against the hōjō Regents in the so-called WADA Cesena, his son Asahina Yoshihide broke into the ōkura Bakufu and burned it to the ground. It was later rebuilt.

Many powerful Gokenin had their mansion in ōkura which, consequently, was one of the most important parts of the medieval kamakura. The Palace gave rise to the names of at least two other areas Toyonaka, Nishi and Higashi Mikado which mean respectively "the Western gate" and "gateway to the East". In the area called Nikaidō 二階堂 formerly called Higashi Mikado, and this name is still sometimes used. Keith Mikado still exists, but is not chō.