ⓘ History of Loughton

                                     

ⓘ History of Loughton

Loughton is a town in the county of Essex in England. The first settlement can be traced back to 2.500 years ago, but the earliest records of the modern-day site of Loughton are from the Anglo-Saxon era of English history, when it was known as Lukintone. After the Norman conquest it became part of the estate of Waltham Abbey and is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Lochintuna. It was during the 17th century, however, when Loughton began to grow significantly as a coaching stop on the newly created main route to Cambridge and East Anglia. With good transport links and proximity to both London and also Epping Forest and the countryside, it became a popular location for aristocratic and wealthy Londoners to have a home.

Most of the great houses of the 17th and 18th centuries disappeared, and most of the modern housing in loughton was built in the Victorian and Edwardian eras, with significant expansion of the city in the 1930-ies. A major factor in the towns continued popularity was the advent of the Railways in the 1850s, and offers direct connections to Central London so that the citizens had easy access for day trips to Epping forest line remains to this day as part of the Central line of the London underground system. At the time the great Eastern railway company did not offer workmens fares to and from loughton, so development of the middle class. Loughton was a fashionable place for artistic and scientific residents in Victorian and Edwardian, as well as a number of prominent residents were also socialists, nonconformists, and social reformers. In the North-Eastern suburb of Debden is a post-war development intended to ease the chronic shortage of housing in London in 1940-ies. An estate of prefabs were built along Oakwood hill road occupation since the summer of 1948.

Today Lawton retains much of its semi-suburban character, which means the city remains predominantly wealthy and middle class. He was given a new national prominence when he was featured in the 2002 TV documentary show Essex wives.