ⓘ Esotropia

                                     

ⓘ Esotropia

Esotropia is a form of strabismus in which one or both eyes turns inward. The condition can be constantly present, or occur intermittently, and can give the affected individual a "cross-eyed" appearance. It is the opposite of exotropia and usually involves more severe axis deviation than esophoria. Esotropia is sometimes erroneously called "lazy eye", which describes the condition of amblyopia - a reduction in vision of one or both eyes that is not the result of any pathology of the eye and cannot be resolved by the use of corrective lenses. Amblyopia can, however, arise as a result of esotropia occurring in childhood: In order to relieve symptoms of diplopia or double vision, the childs brain will ignore or "suppress" the image from the esotropic eye, which when allowed to continue untreated will lead to the development of amblyopia. Treatment options for esotropia include glasses to correct refractive errors, the use of prisms and/or orthoptic exercises and/or eye muscle surgery. The term is from Greek eso meaning "inward" and trope meaning "a turning".

                                     
  • Infantile esotropia is an ocular condition of early onset in which one or either eye turns inward. It is a specific sub - type of esotropia and has been
  • cerebral palsy and a family history of the condition. Types include esotropia where the eyes are crossed cross eyed exotropia, where the eyes
  • can be differentiated from papillitis if esotropia and loss of abduction are also present. However, esotropia may also develop secondarily in an eye that
  • Secondary MFS is a frequent outcome of surgical treatment of congenital esotropia A study of 1981 showed MFS to result in the vast majority of cases if
  • surgery than if not. In a study on infantile esotropia patients who had either small - angle 8 diopters esotropia or small - angle exotropia of the same size
  • can be due to nerve, muscle, congenital or mechanical anomalies. Unlike esotropia fusion is possible and therefore diplopia is uncommon. Eckstein, AK
  • examiner can detect if there is an exotropia abnormal eye is turned out esotropia abnormal eye is turned in hypertropia abnormal eye higher than the
  • in some strabismus patients with esotropia and is, in particular, characteristic for a form of infantile esotropia also known as Cianci s syndrome. Binasal
  • strabismus where the eyes are deviated outward. It is the opposite of esotropia and usually involves more severe axis deviation than exophoria. People
  • inability of an eye to turn outward and results in a convergent strabismus or esotropia of which the primary symptom is diplopia commonly known as double vision