ⓘ Gyrwas

                                     

ⓘ Gyrwas

Gyrwas was the name of an Anglo-Saxon population of the Fens, divided into northern and southern groups and recorded in the Tribal Hidage, related to the name of Jarrow.

Hugh Candidus, in the XII century chronicler of the Abbey of Peterborough, described its Foundation in the territory of the Gyrwas, called Medeshamstede. Medeshamstede was clearly in the North Gyrwas. Hugh Candidus explains Gyrwas, in which it is used in the present tense, and it means that people "living in the fen or fen hard, as deep bog, called in the Saxon language Gyr ". On the territory of the South Gyrwas included Ali. Æthelthryth of Ely and founded the monastery after her husbands death Tondberht, which is described in Bedes Ecclesiastical history of the English people as the "Prince of the South Gyrwas". The trouble is also described by Thomas, Bishop of Dunwich, in East Anglia as "the province of the Gyrwas", and deacon to his predecessor Felix of Burgundy.

                                     
  • Gyrwas a people listed in the Tribal Hidage, which was in existence by the mid - 9th century. There, the Gyrwas are divided into the North Gyrwas and
  • 1960, p. 268 Jarrow where Ekwall links these marsh dwellers with the Gyrwas who inhabited the area around Ely and Peterborough earlier Medeshamstede
  • Gyrwas the districts corresponding to the modern counties of Huntingdonshire and Cambridgeshire being distinguished as the lands of the North Gyrwas
  • early medieval period by the Gyrwas an Anglo - Saxon tribe. Upon their marriage in 652, Tondbert, a prince of the Gyrwas presented Æthelthryth who became