ⓘ Hyperpnea

                                     

ⓘ Hyperpnea

Hyperpnea is increased depth and rate of breathing. It may be physiologic - as when required to meet metabolic demand of body tissues - or it may be pathologic, as when sepsis is severe.

Sometimes tachypnea differs from hyperpnea, tachypnea when understood as quick and shallow breaths, while hyperpnea is intended for use as a quick and deep breaths. This distinction is not always observed, words can be synonymous. In addition, some speakers maintain the distinction between hyperpnea and hyperventilation, which in hyperpnea, increased breathing rate is desirable because this corresponds to the metabolic needs of the body, but hyperventilation, in which the ventilation is not suitable for bodys needs in addition to metabolic acidosis when CO2 needs to be breathed from. As a result, the decrease in CO2 concentration results in the typical symptoms are dizziness, tingling in peripheries, visual disturbances etc., while in hyperpnea in opposed sense, there is usually no such symptoms. This difference is also not consistently followed.

                                     
  • in metabolic carbon dioxide relative to this increase in ventilation. Hyperpnea on the other hand, is defined as breathing more rapid and deep than breathing
  • respiratory distress Hyperaeration Hyperinflation - increased lung volume Hyperpnea - fast and deep breathing Hyperventilation - increased breathing that
  • when there is no dyspnea. Presentations of labored respiration include: Hyperpnea - faster and or deeper breathing Tachypnea - increased breathing rate
  • Consequently, the most common features include ataxia lack of muscle control hyperpnea abnormal breathing patterns sleep apnea, abnormal eye and tongue movements
  • seconds to 2 minutes. It is an oscillation of ventilation between apnea and hyperpnea with a crescendo - diminuendo pattern, and is associated with changing serum
  • has been widely adopted as part of early warning systems. Apnea Dyspnea Hyperpnea Tachypnea Hypopnea Bradypnea Orthopnea Platypnea Biot s respiration Cheyne - Stokes
  • palpitations, as the heart races to compensate for the falling blood pressure Hyperpnea or sensation of difficulty breathing or swallowing see also hyperventilation
  • tachypnea, hyperpnea ataxic and gasping breathing. Following these initial effects, 5 or 10 µg of TsTX induced hypertension and hyperpnea The largest
  • human, has a volume of about 2.5 3.0 liters. During heavy breathing hyperpnea as, for instance, during exercise, exhalation is brought about by relaxation
  • Supraspinal locomotor centers do do not contribute significantly to the hyperpnea of dynamic exercise Journal of Applied Physiology. 100 3 1077 1083