ⓘ 1987 in video gaming

                                     

ⓘ 1987 in video gaming

  • SSI President Joel Billings acquires the license to the Dungeons and Dragons tabletop role-playing game, setting the stage for the Gold Box line of D&D games.
  • Electronic Arts acquires Batteries Included.
  • New companies: Apogee, The Bitmap Brothers, Empire Interactive, GameTek, Maxis
  • Defunct: Electric Transit, English Software, Muse
  • Atari Games establishes the Tengen division for porting their games to home systems.
  • Nintendo of America, Inc. v. Blockbuster Entertainment lawsuit: Nintendo sues Blockbuster for photocopying complete NES manuals for its rental games. Nintendo wins the suit, and Blockbuster includes original manuals with its rentals.
  • Activision acquires Infocom.
                                     

1.1. Notable releases Arcade

  • July, Technōs Japan releases Double Dragon to arcades, distributed internationally by Taito.
  • July 1, Irem releases scrolling shooter R-Type.
  • August 30, Capcom releases Street Fighter, the first game of the series.
  • February 20, Konami releases Contra
  • Atari Games releases RoadBlasters, Xybots, and APB.
  • Taito releases Rastan and Operation Wolf.
  • Namco releases Wonder Momo, which is their last 8-bit game, Yokai Dochuki, which is their first 16-bit game, Dragon Spirit, Blazer, Quester, Pac-Mania, Galaga 88 and Final Lap.
                                     

1.2. Notable releases Home

  • December 20, Sega releases Phantasy Star on the Master System, featuring a female protagonist.
  • October, Nintendo releases Mike Tysons Punch-Out for NES/Famicom.
  • November 14, Sierra On-Line releases Space Quest II: Vohauls Revenge, the second game in the Space Quest series.
  • August 28, Konami releases Castlevania II: Simons Quest, the second Castlevania title released for the NES.
  • January 14, Nintendo releases Zelda II: The Adventure of Link for the Famicom Disk System in Japan only. The game would go unreleased in America for nearly two years afterwards.
  • FTL Games releases Dungeon Master for the Atari ST.
  • June, Codemasters release Dizzy – The Ultimate Cartoon Adventure
  • Sierra On-Line releases Police Quest: In Pursuit of the Death Angel, the first game in the Police Quest series.
  • July 5, the Leisure Suit Larry in the Land of the Lounge Lizards adventure is released by Sierra Entertainment.
  • June 21, Nihon Falcom releases Ys I: Ancient Ys Vanished for the PC-8801 in Japan only. The games director is Masaya Hashimoto, and it is the first game in the long running Ys series.
  • MIDI Maze for the Atari ST is a first person shooter allowing up to 16 computers to be networked via the built-in MIDI ports for deathmatch-style fights.
  • February 12, Infocom releases Bureaucracy from author Douglas Adams.
  • December 18, Squares Hironobu Sakaguchi releases Final Fantasy for the Famicom in Japan. Originally intended to be the companys last release, the games success resulted in a prolific series. It was released in the U.S.A. 3 years later.
  • August 22, Nintendo releases The Legend of Zelda in America and Europe, a year after being available in Japan.
  • October, LucasArts releases Maniac Mansion, the first game to use the SCUMM engine, innovating the point-and-click interface for the adventure game genre.
  • MicroProse releases Sid Meiers Pirates!, the first game from Meier with his name in the title.
  • December 17, Capcom releases the first Mega Man game in the long-standing series for the NES/Famicom.
  • Ocean Software releases Head Over Heels, an isometric arcade adventure, for several 8-bit home computers.
  • Incentive Software releases Driller, a first person game using 3D filled polygons.
  • July 7, Konami releases Metal Gear for the MSX2 home computer platform in Japan and Europe.
                                     

1.3. Notable releases Hardware

  • October 30, NEC releases the PC-Engine console in Japan.
  • Atari Corporation releases the XE Game System, or Atari XEGS, a repackaged 65XE computer which is the last in the Atari 8-bit family.
  • AdLib sets a de facto standard for PC audio with its Yamaha YM3812-based sound card.
  • Namco develops the Namco System 1 arcade system board, followed later in the year by the Namco System 2.
  • September, Master System released in Europe.
  • Master System is released in Japan.
  • The IBM PCjr is discontinued after three years.
  • Acorn releases the Acorn Archimedes 32-bit home computer, which brought the game Zarch later known on other platforms as Virus to prominence.
  • Commodore releases the lower-cost Amiga 500 which became a significant gaming machine, particularly in Europe, and becomes the best-selling model.
  • April, IBM launches the PS/2 line of computers which introduces VGA graphics and 3.5 inch floppy drives to PCs.