ⓘ History of Nottinghamshire

                                     

ⓘ History of Nottinghamshire

The earliest Teutonic settlers in the district which is now Nottinghamshire were an Anglian tribe who, not later than the 5th century, advanced from Lincolnshire along the Fosseway, and, pushing their way up the Trent valley, settled in the fertile districts of the south and east, the whole region from Nottingham to within a short distance of Southwell being then occupied by the vast forest of Sherwood.

The first mention of the County of Nottingham occurs in 1016, when it was under the leadership of Canute. The boundaries have remained practically unaltered since the time of the "Domesday book" of 1086, a survey, and the eight Domesday wapentakes were unchanged in 1610, in 1719 they were reduced to six, their present number, Oswaldbeck is absorbed in Bassetlaw, of which it forms the North clay division, and check in thurgarton.

Nottinghamshire was originally included in the diocese and province of York, and in 1291 formed a deanery in the composition of the deaneries of Nottingham, Newark, Bingham and Retford. An act of Parliament in 1836 the County was transferred to the diocese of Lincoln and province of Canterbury, with the additional deaneries Sawtelle.

In 1878, created the deaneries of Mansfield, South Bingham, West Bingham, Collingham, Tuxford and Worksop were, and in 1884 a large part of the County was transferred to the newly created diocese of Southwell, the deaneries to be unchanged. The deaneries of Bawtry, Bulwell, Gedling, East Newark and Norwell was established in 1888.