ⓘ Subconjunctival bleeding

                                     

ⓘ Subconjunctival bleeding

Subconjunctival bleeding, also known as subconjunctival hemorrhage, is bleeding from a small blood vessel in the outer layer of the eye into the space between the conjunctiva and the sclera. It results in a red spot in the white of the eye.

Causes include sneezing or coughing, high blood pressure, blood thinners such as aspirin or warfarin, weight lifting, vomiting, rubbing the eyes too vigorously, then choked, straining, eye injury, after eye surgery such as LASIK, and atmospheric pressure changes such as those that occur with diving and the aircraft for ascent and descent.

Diagnosis by visual inspection of the eye. The condition is not dangerous and resolves spontaneously within two weeks. No treatment is required for the solution, artificial tears can be used for discomfort eyes.

                                     
  • classified based on where the bleeding is occurring. The bleeding may occur just underneath the conjuctiva subconjunctival hemorrhage underneath the
  • Bleeding also known as a hemorrhage or haemorrhage, is blood escaping from the circulatory system from damaged blood vessels. Bleeding can occur internally
  • and ecchymoses are common symptoms, as are subconjunctival bleeding and menorrhagia. On average, bleeding will persist for approximately eight days
  • and bleeding in the whites of the eye. Complications can include meconium, respiratory disease, anemia, and still birth. Petechiae and subconjunctival bleeding
  • localized bleeding that extravasate into the surrounding interstitial tissues. Most bruises are not very deep under the skin so that the bleeding causes
  • sometimes resolving spontaneously subconjunctival hemorrhage a sometimes dramatic, but usually harmless, bleeding underneath the conjunctiva most often
  • blistering of the affected limb, spontaneous systemic bleeding of the gums and into the skin, subconjunctival hemorrhage and incoagulable blood. The systemic
  • middle third of the face, bilateral circumorbital ecchymosis, bilateral subconjunctival hemorrhage, epistaxis, CSF rhinorrhoea, dish face deformity, diplopia
  • allows the aqueous fluid to drain from the anterior chamber into the subconjunctival space, a pathway utilized by traditional trabeculectomy and glaucoma
  • febrile illnesses. Other characteristic findings on the eye include subconjunctival bleeding and jaundice. A rash is rarely found in leptospirosis. When a rash
  • iron, folate, or vitamin B12 absorption. Purpura, subconjunctival hemorrhage, or even frank bleeding may reflect hypoprothrombinemia secondary to vitamin