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Destruction of Warsaw

The destruction of Warsaw was Nazi Germanys substantially-effected razing of the city after the 1944 Warsaw Uprising. The uprising had infuriated German leaders, who decided to make an example of the city. In any case, the German razing of the ci ...

EPC Groupe

EPC Groupe is French multinational company that trades in explosives and drilling; its explosives were made mainly for the coal mining industry, and to the British coal mining industry also.

Explosive device

An explosive device is a device that relies on the exothermic reaction of an explosive material to provide a violent release of energy. Applications of explosive devices include: Building implosion demolition Explosive welding Assassination Explo ...

D.H. Griffin Companies

D.H. Griffin Companies is a group of six independently owned but integrated companies that perform contract demolition as well as environmental and site development services. It was founded in 1959 and is headquartered in Greensboro, North Caroli ...

House demolition in the Israeli–Palestinian conflict

House demolition is a method used by the Israeli Defence Forces in Jerusalem, the West Bank, and the Gaza Strip against Palestinians. Since the occupation of the Palestinian territories, following the Six-Day War in 1967, to 2019, it has been est ...

Hydraulic splitter

A hydraulic splitter, also known as rock splitter or darda splitter, is a type of portable hydraulic tool. It is used in demolition jobs which involve breaking large blocks of concrete or rocks. Its use in geology was first popularized by volcano ...

ICE demolition protocol

The ICE Demolition Protocol was produced by EnviroCentre, in partnership with London Remade, for the Institution of Civil Engineers. Launched at the ICE in November 2003, it has subsequently been referenced in planning guidance in both England an ...

Krakatoa (explosive)

Krakatoa is a modular explosive device used for explosive ordnance disposal or demolitions developed by the British company Alford Technologies. The device is designed to fire a number of different projectiles, operates both in air and underwater ...

Nonel

Nonel is a shock tube detonator designed to initiate explosions, generally for the purpose of demolition of buildings and for use in the blasting of rock in mines and quarries. Instead of electric wires, a hollow plastic tube delivers the firing ...

Ship breaking

Ship-breaking or ship demolition is a type of ship disposal involving the breaking up of ships for either a source of parts, which can be sold for re-use, for the extraction of raw materials, chiefly scrap. It may also be known as ship dismantlin ...

Slighting

Slighting is the deliberate damage of high-status buildings to reduce their value as military, administrative or social structures. This destruction of property sometimes extended to the contents of buildings and the surrounding landscape. It is ...

Teardown (real estate)

A teardown is the demolition and replacement of a home or other building that was recently purchased for that purpose. Frequently, the new building is larger than the previous one. Reasons for developers to tear down can include increasing the ap ...

Underwater demolition

Underwater demolition refers to the deliberate destruction or neutralization of man-made or natural underwater obstacles, both for military and civilian purposes.

World Trade Center controlled demolition conspiracy theories

World Trade Center controlled demolition theories contend that the collapse of the World Trade Center was not solely caused by the airliner crash damage that occurred as part of the September 11 attacks, and the resulting fire damage, but by expl ...

Wrecking ball

A wrecking ball is a heavy steel ball, usually hung from a crane, that is used for demolishing large buildings. It was most commonly in use during the 1950s and 1960s. Several wrecking companies claim to have invented the wrecking ball. An early ...

Change detection

In statistical analysis, change detection or change point detection tries to identify times when the probability distribution of a stochastic process or time series changes. In general the problem concerns both detecting whether or not a change h ...

Change detection (GIS)

Change detection for GIS is a process that measures how the attributes of a particular area have changed between two or more time periods. Change detection often involves comparing aerial photographs or satellite imagery of the area taken at diff ...

False alarm

A false alarm, also called a nuisance alarm, is the deceptive or erroneous report of an emergency, causing unnecessary panic and/or bringing resources to a place where they are not needed. False alarms may occur with residential burglary alarms, ...

Linear trend estimation

Linear trend estimation is a statistical technique to aid interpretation of data. When a series of measurements of a process are treated as, for example, a time series, trend estimation can be used to make and justify statements about tendencies ...

Step detection

In statistics and signal processing, step detection is the process of finding abrupt changes in the mean level of a time series or signal. It is usually considered as a special case of the statistical method known as change detection or change po ...

Structural break

In econometrics and statistics, a structural break is an unexpected change over time in the parameters of regression models, which can lead to huge forecasting errors and unreliability of the model in general. This issue was popularised by David ...

Wombling

In statistics, Wombling is any of a number of techniques used for identifying zones of rapid change, typically in some quantity as it varies across some geographical or Euclidean space. It is named for statistician William H. Womble. The techniqu ...

Z-factor

The Z-factor is a measure of statistical effect size. It has been proposed for use in high-throughput screening to judge whether the response in a particular assay is large enough to warrant further attention.

Evolution

Evolution is change in the heritable characteristics of biological populations over successive generations. These characteristics are the expressions of genes that are passed on from parent to offspring during reproduction. Different characterist ...

Outline of evolution

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to evolution: Evolution – change in heritable traits of biological organisms over generations due to natural selection, mutation, gene flow, and genetic drift. Also known as de ...

Aerobic fermentation

Aerobic fermentation is a metabolic process by which cells metabolize sugars via fermentation in the presence of oxygen and occurs through the repression of normal respiratory metabolism. This phenomenon is fairly rare and is primarily observed i ...

Amity-enmity complex

The amity-enmity complex was a term introduced by Sir Arthur Keith. His work, A New Theory of Human Evolution, posited that humans evolved as differing races, tribes, and cultures, exhibiting patriotism, morality, leadership and nationalism. Thos ...

Anti-predator adaptation

Anti-predator adaptations are mechanisms developed through evolution that assist prey organisms in their constant struggle against predators. Throughout the animal kingdom, adaptations have evolved for every stage of this struggle, namely by avoi ...

Applications of evolution

Evolutionary biology, in particular the understanding of how organisms evolve through natural selection, is an area of science with many practical applications. Creationists often claim that the theory of evolution lacks any practical application ...

Assisted evolution

Assisted evolution is the practice of using human intervention to accelerate the rate of natural evolutionary processes. The goal of assisted evolution is to help species adapt to a changing environment more quickly than they would via natural se ...

Avalon explosion

The Avalon explosion, named from the Precambrian fauna of the Avalon Peninsula, is a proposed evolutionary radiation in the history of the Animalia, about 575 million years ago, some 33 million years earlier than the Cambrian explosion.

Big History

Big History is an academic discipline which examines history from the Big Bang to the present. Big History resists specialization, and searches for universal patterns or trends. It examines long time frames using a multidisciplinary approach base ...

Cambrian explosion

The Cambrian explosion or Cambrian radiation was an event approximately 541 million years ago in the Cambrian period when practically all major animal phyla started appearing in the fossil record. It lasted for about 13 – 25 million years and res ...

Catalytic triad

A catalytic triad is a set of three coordinated amino acids that can be found in the active site of some enzymes. Catalytic triads are most commonly found in hydrolase and transferase enzymes. An Acid-Base-Nucleophile triad is a common motif for ...

Character evolution

Character evolution is the process by which a character or trait evolves along the branches of an evolutionary tree. Character evolution usually refers to single changes within a lineage that make this lineage unique from others. These changes ar ...

Evolution of the cochlea

Cochlea is Latin for" snail, shell or screw” and originates from the Greek word κοχλίας kokhlias. The modern definition, the auditory portion of the inner ear, originated in the late 17th century. Within the mammalian cochlea exists the organ of ...

Coloration evidence for natural selection

Animal coloration provided important early evidence for evolution by natural selection, at a time when little direct evidence was available. Three major functions of coloration were discovered in the second half of the 19th century, and subsequen ...

Darwin machine

A Darwin machine is a machine that, like a Turing machine, involves an iteration process that yields a high-quality result, but, whereas a Turing machine uses logic, the Darwin machine uses rounds of variation, selection, and inheritance. In its ...

Deep time

Deep time is the concept of geologic time. The philosophical concept of deep time was developed in the 18th century by Scottish geologist James Hutton ; his "system of the habitable Earth" was a deistic mechanism keeping the world eternally suita ...

Deistic evolution

Deistic evolution is a position in the origins debate which involves accepting the scientific evidence for evolution and age of the universe whilst advocating the view that a deistic God created the universe but has not interfered since. The posi ...

Despeciation

Despeciation is the loss of a unique species of animal due to its combining with another previously distinct species. It is the opposite of speciation and is much more rare. It is similar to extinction in that there is a loss of a unique species ...

Directed evolution (transhumanism)

The term directed evolution is used within the transhumanist community to refer to the idea of applying the principles of directed evolution and experimental evolution to the control of human evolution. In this sense, it is distinct from the use ...

Diversification rates

Diversification rates are the rates at which new species form and living species go extinct. Diversification rates can be estimated from fossils, data on the species diversity of clades and their ages, or phylogenetic trees. Diversification rates ...

Endogenosymbiosis

Endogenosymbiosis is an evolutionary process, proposed by the evolutionary and environmental biologist Roberto Cazzolla Gatti, in which "gene carriers" and symbiotic prokaryotic cells could share parts or all of their genomes in an endogenous sym ...

Escape and radiate coevolution

Escape and radiate coevolution is a multistep process that hypothesizes that an organism under constraints from other organisms will develop new defenses, allowing it to "escape" and then "radiate" into differing species. After a novel defense ha ...

Evolution in fiction

Evolution has been an important theme in fiction, including speculative evolution in science fiction, since the late 19th century, though it began before Charles Darwins time, and reflects progressionist and Lamarckist views as well as Darwins. D ...

The Evolution of God

The Evolution of God is a 2009 book by Robert Wright, in which the author explores the history of the concept of God in the three Abrahamic religions through a variety of means, including archaeology, history, theology, and evolutionary psycholog ...

Evolution of the domesticated cat

The family Felidae, to which all living feline species belong, arose about ten to eleven million years ago. This family is divided into eight major phylogenetic lineages. The domestic cat is a member of the Felis lineage. A number of investigatio ...

Evolutionary algorithm

In artificial intelligence, an evolutionary algorithm is a subset of evolutionary computation, a generic population-based metaheuristic optimization algorithm. An EA uses mechanisms inspired by biological evolution, such as reproduction, mutation ...

Evolutionary computation

In computer science, evolutionary computation is a family of algorithms for global optimization inspired by biological evolution, and the subfield of artificial intelligence and soft computing studying these algorithms. In technical terms, they a ...