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Insurance Law Reform Act 1977

The ’’Insurance Law Reform Act ’’ was the first of several such named acts that regulated certain aspects of the insurance industry in New Zealand. Section 4 and 5 prohibits any insurance claim declined due to any misstatement by the applicant th ...

Insurance patent

Under some patent laws, patents may be obtained for insurance-related inventions. Historically, patents could only cover the technological aspects of a new insurance invention. This is still the case in most countries. In the United States, howev ...

Loss of use

Loss of use is the inability, due to a tort or other injury to use a body part, animal, equipment, premises, or other property. Law.com defines it as "the inability to use an automobile, premises or some equipment due to damage to the vehicle, pr ...

Model Audit Rule 205

The Model Audit Rule 205, Model Audit Rule, or MAR 205 are the commonly applied terms for the Annual Financial Reporting Model Regulation. Model Audit Rule is a financial reporting regulation applicable to insurance companies, and borrows signifi ...

Motor vehicle insurance law in India

Motor vehicle insurance law in India is governed by the Motor Vehicles Act, Insurance Act and aspects of insurance contracts governed by the Indian Contract Act, Transfer of Property Act and a few others. Motor vehicle insurance is the insurance ...

National Flood Insurance Program

The National Flood Insurance Program is a program created by the Congress of the United States in 1968 through the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968. U.S. Congress has the twofold purposes of the NFIP to share the risk of flood losses through ...

No-fault insurance

In its broadest sense, no-fault insurance is any type of insurance contract under which the insured party is indemnified by their own insurance company for losses, regardless of the source of the cause of loss. In this sense, it is no different f ...

Peracomo Inc v TELUS Communications Co

Peracomo Inc v TELUS Communications Co 2014 SCC 29 is a decision of the Supreme Court of Canada concerning the law of marine insurance, which also has international impact.

Proposition 103

California voters passed Proposition 103 on November 8, 1988. It in effect made insurance companies require "prior approval" from the California Department of Insurance before implementing property and casualty insurance rates. It passed with 51% ...

QC clause

In insurance law, a QC clause is a clause in an insurance policy that provides that an action against the insured is not to be contested unless a Queens Counsel advises that the defence has a reasonable prospect of success. The principal reason f ...

South African insurance law

Insurance in South Africa describes a mechanism in that country for the reduction or minimisation of loss, owing to the constant exposure of people and assets to risks. The kinds of loss which arise if such risks eventuate may be either patrimoni ...

Subrogation

Subrogation is the assumption by a third party of another partys legal right to collect a debt or damages. It is a legal doctrine whereby one person is entitled to enforce the subsisting or revived rights of another for ones own benefit. A right ...

Total permanent disability insurance

Total Permanent Disability is a phrase used in the insurance industry and in law. Generally speaking, it means that because of a sickness or injury, a person is unable to work in their own or any occupation for which they are suited by training, ...

Uninsured motorist clause

An uninsured motorist clause is a provision commonly found in United States automobile insurance policies that provides for a driver to receive damages for any injury he or she receives from an uninsured, negligent driver. The owner of the policy ...

Adelphi Charter

The Adelphi Charter on Creativity, Innovation and Intellectual Property is the result of a project commissioned by the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures & Commerce, London, UK, and is intended as a positive statement of wh ...

Advance against royalties

In the field of intellectual property licensing, an advance against royalties is a payment made by the licensee to the licensor at the start of the period of licensing which is to be offset against future royalty payments. It is also known as a g ...

Anaqua (company)

Anaqua is a Boston, MA based provider of intellectual asset management and SaaS software and services. Anaqua’s Enterprise IAM solution supports the IA lifecycle from idea to monetization for all IA categories, including inventions, patents, trad ...

Anton Piller order

In English and English-derived legal systems, an Anton Piller order is a court order that provides the right to search premises and seize evidence without prior warning. This is intended to prevent the destruction of relevant evidence, particular ...

Arrow information paradox

The Arrow information paradox, and occasionally referred to as Arrows disclosure paradox, named after Kenneth Arrow, American economist and joint winner of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics with John Hicks, is a problem that companies face wh ...

Nick Ashton-Hart

Nick Ashton-Hart is the Geneva Representative of the Digital Trade Network and represents the ICC United Kingdom on the UK delegation to the meetings of the International Telecommunications Union. He has served in various capacities as the repres ...

Asset reuse

The reuse of Intellectual Property assets is a strategy that many, in particular IT, companies are pursuing. The strategy for reusing non-IT related assets is called Asset recovery. However, the term recovery is not being applied to Intellectual ...

Australian design law

The Commonwealth of Australias Designs Act 2003 replaced the Designs Act 1906. The legislation assists in the protection of the overall appearance of a product resulting from one or more visual features of the product. Although there are some ove ...

Background, foreground, sideground and postground intellectual property

In the context of research and development collaborations, background, foreground, sideground and postground intellectual property are four distinct forms of intellectual property assets. These are included in the broader and more general categor ...

Bellagio declaration

The Bellagio Declaration is a resolution formed in 1993, with the aim of reforming intellectual property laws in order to foster the protection of folkloric works, works of cultural heritage, and the biological and ecological know-how of traditio ...

Brand licensing

Licensing means renting or leasing of an intangible asset. It is a process of creating and managing contracts between the owner of a brand and a company or individual who wants to use the brand in association with a product, for an agreed period ...

Center for Copyright Information

The Center for Copyright Information is an American organization focused on advocacy and initiatives in support of copyright law. The CCI aims to educate the public about copyright law; coordinates with copyright owners and Internet service provi ...

Chain of title

A chain of title is the sequence of historical transfers of title to a property. It is a valuable tool to identify and document past owners of a property and serves as a propertys historical ownership timeline. The "chain" runs from the present o ...

Church of Spiritual Technology

The Church of Spiritual Technology is a California 501 non-profit corporation, incorporated in 1982, which owns all the copyrights of the estate of L. Ron Hubbard and licenses their use. CST does business as L. Ron Hubbard Library. A 1993 memoran ...

Clean tech law

Clean Tech Law contemplates a diverse set of legal and policy issues related to the development and commercialization of clean technology. These issues range from conventional natural resources law to cutting-edge intellectual property issues rel ...

Code of non-infringement

The code of non-infringement is the accepted business practice and custom among certain performance artists, particularly clowns, that an artists unique performance attributes are proprietary and cannot be used or claimed by another. Among clowns ...

Collective work

A collective work is a work that contains the works of several authors assembled and published under the direction of one natural or legal person who owns the copyright in the work as a whole. Definitions vary considerably from one country to ano ...

Collective work (France)

A collective work under the copyright law of France is a collective work that contains the works of several authors created, assembled, harmonized and published under the direction of a person or organization who owns the commercial and moral rig ...

Collective work (US)

A collective work in the Copyright law of the United States is a work that contains the works of several authors assembled and published into a collective whole. The owner of the work has the property rights in the collective work, but the author ...

Colour trade mark

A colour trade mark is a non-conventional trade mark where at least one colour is used to perform the trade mark function of uniquely identifying the commercial origin of products or services. In recent times colours have been increasingly used a ...

Compliance and Robustness

Compliance and Robustness, sometimes abbreviated as C&R, refers to the legal structure or regime underlying a Digital Rights Management system. In many cases, the C&R regime for a given DRM is provided by the same company that sells the D ...

Confusion in Canadian trademark law

Under Canadian trade-mark law, "confusion" is where a trade-mark is similar enough to another trade-mark to cause consumers to equate them. Likelihood of confusion plays a central role in trade-mark registration, infringement and passing-off. Whe ...

Contributor License Agreement

A Contributor License Agreement defines the terms under which intellectual property has been contributed to a company/project, typically software under an open source license.

Copynorms

As used by copyright theorists, the term copynorm is used to refer to a normalized social standard regarding the ethical issue of duplicating copyrighted material. Questions about the ethics of copying came to public attention as a result of peer ...

Copyright

Copyright is the exclusive right given to the creator of a creative work to reproduce the work, usually for a limited time. The creative work may be in a literary, artistic, educational, or musical form. Copyright is intended to protect the origi ...

Copyright Clause

The Copyright Clause describes an enumerated power listed in the United States Constitution. The clause states that: To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to ...

Copyright for Creativity

Copyright for Creativity - A Declaration for Europe issued on 5 May 2010, is intended as a statement of how copyright policy could be constructed in the Internet Age. It comes against the background of political debate within Europe to rethink co ...

Copyright protection for fictional characters

Copyright protection is available to the creators of a range of works including literary, musical, dramatic and artistic works. Recognition of fictional characters as works eligible for copyright protection has come about with the understanding t ...

Copyright term

Copyright subsists for a variety of lengths in different jurisdictions. The length of the term can depend on several factors, including the type of work e.g. musical composition or novel, whether the work has been published or not, and whether th ...

Counteraction principle

The counteraction principle or counteraction theory is a legal principle which relates to the use of intellectual property where two marks are phonetically similar and where such a situation could lead to public confusion between brands.

Creative Commons license

A Creative Commons license is one of several public copyright licenses that enable the free distribution of an otherwise copyrighted "work". A CC license is used when an author wants to give other people the right to share, use, and build upon a ...

Cross-border injunction

In European Union law, and especially in European intellectual property law, a cross-border injunction is an injunction by a court in one European country, such as for example a court in the Netherlands forbidding infringement in several other Eu ...

Defend Innovation

Defend Innovation is a patent reform project started by Electronic Frontier Foundation in June 2012. The project initially proposed seven changes to United Statess patent system, including shortening the term for software patents, requirement to ...

Design around

In the field of patents, the phrase "to design around means to invent an alternative to a patented invention that does not infringe the patent’s claims. The phrase can also refer to the invention itself. Design-arounds are considered to be one of ...

Directive on the Protection of Trade Secrets

The Directive on the protection of undisclosed know-how and business information against their unlawful acquisition, use and disclosure is a Directive of the European Parliament and the European Council which was adopted by the European Council o ...

Drug Master File

Drug Master File or DMF is a document prepared by a pharmaceutical manufacturer and submitted solely at its discretion to the appropriate regulatory authority in the intended drug market. There is no regulatory requirement to file a DMF. However, ...