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Selectorate theory

The selectorate theory is detailed in The Logic of Political Survival, authored by Bruce Bueno de Mesquita of New York University, Alastair Smith of NYU, Randolph M. Siverson of UC Davis, and James D. Morrow of the University of Michigan.

Serfdom in Tibet controversy

The serfdom in Tibet controversy is a political debate over the extent and nature of serfdom in Tibet prior to the incorporation of Tibet into the Peoples Republic of China in 1951. The ultimate goal of the debate, on the Chinese side, is to legi ...

Systems theory in political science

Systems theory in political science is a highly abstract, partly holistic view of politics, influenced by cybernetics. The adaptation of system theory to political science was first conceived by David Easton in 1953.

History of terrorism

The history of terrorism is a history of well-known and historically significant individuals, entities, and incidents associated, whether rightly or wrongly, with terrorism. Scholars agree that terrorism is a disputed term, and very few of those ...

Tryphe

Tryphe -- variously glossed as "softness", "voluptuousness", "magnificence" and "extravagance", none fully adequate - is a concept that drew attention in Roman antiquity when it became a significant factor in the reign of the Ptolemaic dynasty. C ...

The Use of Knowledge in Society

The Use of Knowledge in Society is a scholarly article written by economist Friedrich Hayek, first published in the September 1945 issue of The American Economic Review. Written along with The Meaning of Competition as a rebuttal to fellow econom ...

Valence issue

A valence issue is a political issue about which voters will usually share a common preference. Prosperity is a common valence issue. All voters will want their community to prosper and so the consideration is not whether to seek prosperity or no ...

World Social Capital Monitor

The World Social Capital Monitor is an instrument for measuring social goods and social capital created by the United Nations Sustainable Development Group in partnership with civil society actors. The project identifies social values such as tru ...

World Values Survey

The World Values Survey is a global research project that explores peoples values and beliefs, how they change over time, and what social and political impact they have. Since 1981 a worldwide network of social scientists have conducted represent ...

Regional science

Regional science is a field of the social sciences concerned with analytical approaches to problems that are specifically urban, rural, or regional. Topics in regional science include, but are not limited to location theory or spatial economics, ...

Location theory

Location theory has become an integral part of economic geography, regional science, and spatial economics. Location theory addresses questions of what economic activities are located where and why. Location theory or microeconomic theory general ...

European Observation Network for Territorial Development and Cohesion

The European Observation Network for Territorial Development and Cohesion, ESPON for short, is a European funded programme under the objective of "European Territorial Cooperation" of the Cohesion Policy of the European Union. It is co-funded by ...

European Spatial Development Perspective

The European Spatial Development Perspective is a document approved by the Informal Council of Ministers of Spatial Planning of European Commission in Potsdam in 1999. It is a legally non-binding document forming a policy framework with 60 policy ...

Hamburg Aviation

Hamburg Aviation is the brand name of the "Luftfahrtcluster Metropolregion Hamburg e.V.", an association of companies, research institutions, educational institutions and the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, with the goal of promoting the avia ...

Input–output model

In economics, an input–output model is a quantitative economic model that represents the interdependencies between different sectors of a national economy or different regional economies. Wassily Leontief is credited with developing this type of ...

Journal of Regional Science

The Journal of Regional Science is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by Wiley-Blackwell. Established in 1958, it was the first journal in the field of Regional science. The current editors-in-chief are Marlon G. Boarnet, Steven Brakman, ...

Land use

Land use involves the management and modification of natural environment or wilderness into built environment such as settlements and semi-natural habitats such as arable fields, pastures, and managed woods. Land use by humans has a long history, ...

Land-use forecasting

Land-use forecasting undertakes to project the distribution and intensity of trip generating activities in the urban area. In practice, land-use models are demand-driven, using as inputs the aggregate information on growth produced by an aggregat ...

Regional Input-Output Modeling System

The Regional Input–Output Modeling System is a regional economic model developed and maintained by the US Bureau of Economic Analysis. Regional input–output multipliers such as the RIMS II multipliers allow estimates of how a one-time or sustaine ...

Regional planning organization

A Regional Planning Organization is a government body that guides the development of public and private resources in a manner that ensures public safety, well being and livability. Regional planning organizations take different forms and may also ...

Shift-share analysis

A shift-share analysis, used in regional science, political economy, and urban studies, determines what portions of regional economic growth or decline can be attributed to national, economic industry, and regional factors. The analysis helps ide ...

Soil conservation

Soil conservation is the prevention of loss of the top most layer of the soil from erosion or prevention of reduced fertility caused by over usage, acidification, salinization or other chemical soil contamination. Slash-and-burn and other unsusta ...

Spatial econometrics

Spatial econometrics is the field where spatial analysis and econometrics intersect. The term" spatial econometrics” was introduced for the first time by the Belgian economist Jean Paelinck in the general address he delivered to the annual meetin ...

Spatial Economic Analysis

Spatial Economic Analysis is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal covering the development of theory and methods in spatial economics. It is published by Routledge on behalf of the Regional Studies Association and the British and Irish Sect ...

Transport economics

Transport economics is a branch of economics founded in 1959 by American economist John R. Meyer that deals with the allocation of resources within the transport sector. It has strong links to civil engineering. Transport economics differs from s ...

Urban economics

Urban economics is broadly the economic study of urban areas; as such, it involves using the tools of economics to analyze urban issues such as crime, education, public transit, housing, and local government finance. More specifically, it is a br ...

Action research

Action research is a philosophy and methodology of research generally applied in the social sciences. It seeks transformative change through the simultaneous process of taking action and doing research, which are linked together by critical refle ...

Artificial society

Artificial society is the specific agent based computational model for computer simulation in social analysis. It is mostly connected to the theme in complex system, emergence, Monte Carlo method, computational sociology, multi-agent system, and ...

Assortative mixing

In the study of complex networks, assortative mixing, or assortativity, is a bias in favor of connections between network nodes with similar characteristics. In the specific case of social networks, assortative mixing is also known as homophily. ...

Attitude-behavior consistency

Attitude-behavior consistency is when a persons attitude is consistent with their behavior. This is not true in many cases. The fact that people often express attitudes that are inconsistent with how they act may surprise those unfamiliar with so ...

Bogus pipeline

The bogus pipeline is a fake polygraph used to get participants to truthfully respond to emotional/affective questions in survey. It is a technique used by social psychologists to reduce false answers when attempting to collect self-report data. ...

Causal research

Causal research, also called explanatory research, is the investigation of cause-and-effect relationships. To determine causality, it is important to observe variation in the variable assumed to cause the change in the other variable, and then me ...

Comparative research

Comparative research is a research methodology in the social sciences that aims to make comparisons across different countries or cultures. A major problem in comparative research is that the data sets in different countries may define categories ...

Critical discourse analysis

Critical discourse analysis is an interdisciplinary approach to the study of discourse, or put simply talk and text, that views language as a form of social practice. Scholars working in the tradition of CDA generally argue that social practice a ...

Cybermethodology

Cybermethodology is a newly emergent field that focuses on the creative development and use of computational and technological research methodologies for the analysis of next-generation data sources such as the Internet. The first formal academic ...

Exploratory research

Exploratory research is "the preliminary research to clarify the exact nature of the problem to be solved." It is used to ensure additional research is taken into consideration during an experiment as well as determining research priorities, coll ...

Feeling thermometer

A feeling thermometer, also known as a thermometer scale, is a type of visual analog scale that allows respondents to rank their views of a given subject on a scale from "cold" to "hot", analogous to the temperature scale of a real thermometer. I ...

Future workshop

The future workshop is a futures technique developed by Robert Jungk, Ruediger Lutz and Norbert R. Muellert in the 1970s. It enables a group of people to develop new ideas or solutions of social problems. A future workshop is particularly suitabl ...

Graph algebra (social sciences)

Graph algebra is systems-centric modeling tool for the social sciences. It was first developed by Sprague, Pzeworski, and Cortes as a hybridized version of engineering plots to describe social phenomena.

Praxis intervention

Praxis intervention is a form of participatory action research that emphasizes working on the praxis potential, or phronesis, of its participants. This contrasts with other forms of participatory action research, which emphasize the collective mo ...

Q methodology

Q Methodology is a research method used in psychology and in social sciences to study peoples "subjectivity" - that is, their viewpoint. Q was developed by psychologist William Stephenson. It has been used both in clinical settings for assessing ...

Bachelor of Social Science

The academic undergraduate degree of Bachelor of Social Science requires three to four years of study at an institution of higher education, primarily found in the Commonwealth of Nations. It can be distinguished from standard other undergraduate ...

Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust

The Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust is a specialist mental health trust based in north London. The Trust specialises in talking therapies. The education and training department caters for 2.000 students a year from the United Kingdom a ...

Triangulation (social science)

In the social sciences, triangulation refers to the application and combination of several research methods in the study of the same phenomenon. By combining multiple observers, theories, methods, and empirical materials, researchers hope to over ...

Unobtrusive research

Unobtrusive research is a method of data collection used primarily in the social sciences. The term "unobtrusive measures" was first coined by Webb, Campbell, Schwartz, & Sechrest in a 1966 book titled Unobtrusive Measures: nonreactive research i ...

Sociology

Sociology is a study of society, patterns of social relationships, social interaction and culture of everyday life. It is a social science that uses various methods of empirical investigation and critical analysis to develop a body of knowledge a ...

Decommodification

In political economics, decommodification is the strength of social entitlements and citizens degree of immunization from market dependency. Decommodification, in regards to the labor force, describes a "degree to which individual, or families, c ...

Illusion of inclusion

The illusion of inclusion has been defined as the" sometimes subtle ways that the standards can appear to adequately address race while at the same time marginalizing it.” The illusion of inclusion was characterized by Helen Turnbull in terms of ...

Adam Possamai

Adam Possamai is a sociologist and novelist born in Belgium and living in Australia. Possamai is Professor in Sociology and the Deputy Dean in the School of Social Sciences and Psychology at Western Sydney University, New South Wales, Australia. ...

Sladdbarn

Sladdbarn is a Swedish term to refer to a child who is born much later than their other siblings. There are similar terms for the concept in many other Nordic languages and some others.