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Mauretania Sitifensis

In the later division of the Roman Empire under the Emperor Diocletian, the eastern part of Mauretania Caesariensis, from Saldae to the river Ampsaga, was erected into a new province, and called Mauretania Sitifensis from the inland town of Setif ...

Damavand, Iran

Damavand is a city and capital of Damavand County, Tehran Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 1.231.500 in 260.279 families. Damavand is an ancient and historical city. The name Damavand appears in Sassanid texts as Dunbawand, ...

Kazerun

Kazeroon is a city and capital of Kazeroon County, Fars Province, Iran. In 2016, as the fifth big city in the province, its population was 96.683. Its agricultural products include date palms, citrus orchards, wheat, tobacco, rice, cotton, and vi ...

Tawwaj

Tawwaj was located on or close to the Shapur River in the region of Fars, about 65 kilometers 40 mi from the Persian Gulf coast. During the Sasanian and early Islamic period it served as an important commercial center. It was captured and garriso ...

Palapa oath

The Palapa oath was an oath taken by Gajah Mada, a 14th-century Prime Minister of the Javanese Majapahit Empire described in the Pararaton. In this oath Gajah Mada swore that he would not taste any spice, as long as he had not succeeded in unifyi ...

Sunan Bungkul

Sunan Bungkul, whose real name is Ki Ageng Supo or Mpu Supo, was a nobleman from the time of Majapahit Kingdom, who after converting to Islam used the name Ki Ageng Mahmuddin. He was one of the spreaders of Islam in the late 15th century in the M ...

Adwayawarman

Adwayawarman was the father of King Adityawarman of Malayapura kingdom as mentioned in the Kuburajo I Inscription. His alias name was Adwayadwaja, as he was called in the Bukit Gombak Inscription. Historian Slamet Muljana suspect that Adwayawarma ...

Holloway Manor

Holloway Manor was a manor house on the Isle of Wight, situated within the Newchurch parish. It lies just to the north of Ventnor. It was held of the honour of Carisbrooke Castle and formed part of the estate of John de Lisle in the Island at the ...

Henry Appleton (captain)

He was a townsman and presumably a native of Hull, but his name does not appear in any list of naval officers during the civil war or until 26 September 1650, when an order was sent by the parliament to the council of state to appoint him `as com ...

Christopher Atkinson (missionary)

Christopher Atkinson was an early Quaker missionary from Westmorland and one of the Valiant Sixty. Already married, he caused a minor scandal among the Society by attempting to seduce another woman.

Robert Everard

Robert Everard was an English soldier who fought for the Parliamentary cause during the English Civil War and was a religious controversialist in the 1650s. He promoted Baptist views, Socinianism and Arianism, and in later years declared himself ...

Sir John Molyneux, 1st Baronet

Sir John Molyneux of Teversal, High Sheriff of Nottinghamshire. Molyneux was the son of Thomas Molyneux D. 1597 and Alice Cranmer of Aslockton, daughter of Thomas Cranmer, great-nephew of Archbishop Thomas Cranmer. After the death of Thomas Molyn ...

Thomas Vesey (archdeacon)

Thomas Vesey was Archdeacon of Armagh from 1655 to 1662, and again from 1663 to 1669. Vizi was born in England and educated at Trinity College, Dublin. He spent time in Derry and Ballyscullion.

Thomas Wight, A.M.

Thomas Wight, A.M., was an English churchman, elected Dean of Cork. He was grandfather of the Quaker, Thomas Wight. A native of Guildford, Surrey, he was ordained deacon and priest John, Bishop of Oxford, on 23 October 1619. In 1620 he became pre ...

London Underground Church

The London underground church was an illegal puritan group in the time of Elizabeth I and James I. It began as a radical fringe of the Church of England, but split from the Church and later became part of the Brownist or puritan Separatist moveme ...

Ormeley Lodge

Ormeley Lodge is an early 18th-century Georgian house set in 6 acres on the edge of Ham Common near to Richmond Park in Ham, London. It is owned by Lady Annabel Goldsmith.

Bolebroke Castle

Bolebroke Castle is a 15th-century hunting lodge located north of the village of Hartfield, East Sussex, England. It is a grade II* listed building. The house was built about 1480. Henry VIII is said to have stayed at Bolebroke when he went hunti ...

Charlton Park, Wiltshire

Charlton Park is a country house and estate in Wiltshire, England, 2 miles northeast of the town of Malmesbury. Charlton Park House is a Grade I listed building and a leading example of the prodigy house. Malmesbury Abbey held Charlton manor from ...

Costessey Hall

Costessey Hall was a manor house in Costessey, Norfolk, England, four miles west of Norwich. The first mention of it dates to 1066, when William I gave it to Alan Rufus, Earl of Richmond. It was then described as Costessey Manor. In 1555, Mary I ...

Drury House

Drury House was a historic building on Wych Street, London. It was the house of Sir Robert Drury, after whom Drury Lane was named. It was a meeting place for Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex and his accomplices in 1601, when they were plotting ...

Baron Dynham

Baron Dynham is a title which has been used twice in the English peerage, for: John Dynham, 1st Baron Dynham c.1434-1501, summoned by writs of Kings Edward IV and Henry VII to attend parliaments from 28 February 1467 to 16 January 1497, the writs ...

Grimston Manor

Grimston Manor was a manor house in Norfolk, England. In 1524, it was given to George Boleyn, the first grant King Henry VIII made to Boleyn. It is assumed that this was given on the wedding of George to Jane Parker. Henry VIII was around this ti ...

Hoxne manor

Hoxne manor in Suffolk, England was mentioned in the 1086 Domesday Survey as a seat of the East Anglian bishops, from around that date being the bishops of Norwich, a transition from the bishops of Thetford. The Domesday name of Hoxne hundred, an ...

Minster Lovell Hall

Minster Lovell Hall was built by William Lovell around 1440. As Minster Lovell was one of the earliest estates held by the Lovell family and one of their main residences it was at least the second building occupying this site. The hall was fairly ...

Packwood House

Packwood House is a timber-framed Tudor manor house near Lapworth, Warwickshire. Owned by the National Trust since 1941, the house is a Grade I listed building. It has a wealth of tapestries and fine furniture, and is known for the garden of yews.

Rochford Hall

Rochford Hall is a manor in Rochford, Essex, England. During the reign of King Henry VIII, it belonged to Thomas Boleyn, who was then Viscount Rochford, and it was the marital home of his daughter Mary Boleyn, sister of Anne Boleyn, and Marys sec ...

Shiplake Court

Shiplake Court was a historic manor house near Henley-on-Thames in Oxfordshire, England. In the sixteenth century, it was the residence of Edmund Plowden. In 1897, it had its own electricity generating plant, managed by Stuart Turner. The indepen ...

Suffolk Place

Suffolk Place was a mansion house located on the west side of Borough High Street in Southwark, Surrey, on the south bank of the River Thames opposite the City of London. It was the London town house of the Dukes of Suffolk, and was located near ...

Westhorpe Hall

Westhorpe Hall was a manor house in Westhorpe, Suffolk, England. Westhorpe hall was the residence of Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk and Princess Mary Tudor-daughter of king Henry VII and sister of king Henry VIII, the marriage of love and m ...

Barrow Court

Barrow Court is a manor house in Barrow Gurney, Somerset, England. The site was originally Barrow Gurney Nunnery and was rebuilt in the 16th and 19th centuries. It has been designated as a Grade II* listed building.

Dorton House, Buckinghamshire

Dorton House is a Grade I Listed Jacobean country house near the village of Dorton in Buckinghamshire, England. It was built between 1596 and 1626. It currently houses Ashfold School, an independent day and boarding preparatory school for about 2 ...

Felbrigg Hall

Felbrigg Hall is a 17th-century English country house near the village of that name in Norfolk. Part of a National Trust property, the unaltered 17th-century house is noted for its Jacobean architecture and fine Georgian interior. Outside is a wa ...

Gainford Hall

Gainford Hall is a privately owned Jacobean manor house at Gainford, County Durham. It is a Grade I listed building but as of 2014 is registered as a Building at Risk. The house was built in about 1603 designs may architect Robert Smithson for th ...

Haremere Hall

The hall is approximately 11.000-square-foot 1.000 m 2 in size and sited in an 84-acre 34 ha grounds. It is around 12 miles north of Hastings and the grounds overlook the River Rother.

Ingestre Hall

Ingestre Hall is a Grade II* 17th-century Jacobean mansion situated at Ingestre, near Stafford, Staffordshire, England. Formerly the seat of the Earls Talbot and then the Earls of Shrewsbury, the hall is now owned by Sandwell Metropolitan Borough ...

Landguard Manor

Landguard Manor is a manor house in Shanklin on the Isle of Wight, England. Mentioned in the Domesday Book, over the centuries it was home to numerous notable gentlemen. It is a Grade II listed building. One of the finest known portraits by Sir T ...

Simonstone, Lancashire

Simonstone is a small village and civil parish in the Ribble Valley district of Lancashire, England. The population of the civil parish taken at the 2011 census was 1.154. It is about 4 miles west of Burnley and south of Pendle Hill and Clitheroe ...

Westwood House

Westwood House is a stately home, near Droitwich, Worcestershire, England. It has been subdivided into twelve self-contained apartments. The house has origins as an Elizabethan banqueting hall with Caroline additions and is a Grade I listed build ...

Jacobite peerage

The Jacobite peerage includes those peerages created by James II and VII, and the subsequent Jacobite pretenders, after James’s deposition from the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland following the Glorious Revolution of 1688. These creation ...

Gormshuil Mhor na Maighe

Gormshuil Mhor na Maighe fl. 17th century was a powerful Gaelic witch from the Lochaber area of Scotland. Married Cameron, my Gormshuil, which means that the blue-eyed noble one in Gaelic, was known for his supernatural powers and fishermen and h ...

John Graham of Duchray

John Graham of Duchray, Scottish landowner and soldier, was born in Scotland around 1600 and died around 1700. He married Marion Graham of Rednock, and had a son, Thomas Graham of Duchray. Marion Graham, of Rednock, was the daughter of John Graha ...

Edward Bland (explorer)

Edward Bland was an English explorer and merchant. Bland was born in England, John and Susan soft and was one of several children. He was baptized on 5 Feb 1614 in St. Stephen street, ward Coleman. Soft about 1634 married his cousin Jane bland, d ...

Dumfries Castle

Dumfries Castle was a royal castle that was located in Dumfries, Scotland. It was sited by the River Nith, in the area now known as Castledykes Park. A Motte and Bailey castle was built in the 12th century. The town was created a Royal town by ki ...

Boghall Castle

The courtyard castle was built in the 14th century by the Fleming family, to replace the motte and bailey castle at Biggar. The castle was strategically sited where the valleys of the River Tweed and the River Clyde meet. Edward II of England sta ...

Douglas, South Lanarkshire

Douglas is a village in South Lanarkshire, Scotland. It is located on the south bank of the Douglas Water and on the A70 road that links Ayr, on the West coast of Scotland, to Edinburgh on the East, around 12 miles south west of Lanark. The place ...

Earl of Morton

The title Earl of Morton was created in the Peerage of Scotland in 1458 for James Douglas of Dalkeith. Along with it, the title Lord Aberdour was granted. This latter title is the courtesy title for the eldest son and heir to the Earl of Morton. ...

Lord of Abernethy

The Lord of Abernethy was from the 12th century to the 14th century the hereditary holder of the church and lands of the Scottish monastery at Abernethy. It gradually evolved alongside the title Abbot of Abernethy, displacing that term in extant ...

Liddesdale

Liddesdale, the valley of the Liddel Water, in the County of Roxburgh, southern Scotland, extends in a south-westerly direction from the vicinity of Peel Fell to the River Esk, a distance of 21 miles. The Waverley route of the North British Railw ...

Kilspindie Castle

Kilspindie Castle lies north of the village of Aberlady, in East Lothian, Scotland, the remains of the castle are behind the Victorian St Marys Kirk. An early castle was destroyed in the 16th century, and the rebuilt tower was pulled down by the ...

Timpendean Tower

Timpendean Tower or Typenden Castle as it was once known, is a ruined 15th-century tower house near Lanton, around 1.5 miles north-west of Jedburgh in the Scottish Borders.