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History of Cheshire

The history of Cheshire can be traced back to the Hoxnian Interglacial, between 400.000 and 380.000 years BP. Primitive tools that date to that period have been found. Stone Age remains have been found showing more permanent habitation during the ...

Timeline of Cheshire history

429: Germanus of Auxerre wins the Battle of Maes Garmon, near Mold, and establishes Cadell as the Christian ruler of a region, later Powys, based on pre-Roman Cornovii territory, thought to include Cheshire. C. 90: Legio XX Valeria Victrix arrive ...

History of Cornwall

The history of Cornwall goes back to the Paleolithic, but in this period Cornwall only had sporadic visits by groups of humans. Continuous occupation started around 10.000 years ago after the end of the last ice age. When recorded history started ...

Prehistoric Cumbria

Prehistoric Cumbria describes that part of north-west England, subsequently the county of Cumbria, prior to the coming of the Romans. Barrowclough puts the archaeological record of the county at 443 stone tools, 187 metal objects and 134 pots, pl ...

Roman Cumbria

Roman Cumbria was an area that lay on the north-west frontier of Roman Britain, and, indeed, of the Roman Empire itself. Interest in the Roman occupation of the region lies in this frontier aspect - why did the Romans choose to occupy the north-w ...

History of Derbyshire

The origins of Derbyshire Derbyshire first mentioned in the Anglo-Saxon chronicle in 1048 in the manuscript D of the chronicle, known as the Northern recension”. Its creation is the result of the dismemberment of the Kingdom of Mercia province of ...

History of Devon

Devon is a county in south west England, bordering Cornwall to the west with Dorset and Somerset to the east. There is evidence of occupation in the county from Stone Age times onward. Its recorded history starts in the Roman period when it was a ...

History of Dorset

The first known settlement of Dorset was by Mesolithic hunters, who returned to Britain at a time when it was still attached to Europe by a land-bridge, around 12.500 BC. The population was very small, maybe only a few thousand across the whole o ...

History of Essex

Essex is a county in the East of England which originated as the ancient Kingdom of Essex and one of the seven kingdoms, or heptarchy, that went on to form the Kingdom of England.

History of Gloucestershire

The region now known as Gloucestershire was originally inhabited by Brythonic peoples in the Iron Age and Roman periods. After the Romans left Britain in the early 5th century, the Brythons re-established control but the territorial divisions for ...

History of Hampshire

Hampshire is a county in Southern England with some notable archaeology and many notable historic buildings. In the downland chalk hills of the South downs and the southern part of Salisbury plain has been inhabited since the Neolithic, and these ...

History of Herefordshire

The History of Herefordshire starts with a shire in the time of Athelstan, and Herefordshire is mentioned in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in 1051. The first Anglo-Saxon settlers, the Magonsætan, were a sub-tribal unit of the Hwicce who occupied the ...

History of West Sussex

Sussex, from the Old English Sūþsēaxe, is a historic county in South East England. From fossil evidence from Boxgrove man Homo man Heidelberg shows that Sussex was inhabited for at least 500.000 years. It is considered the oldest human fossil eve ...

History of Kent

Kent has been occupied since the Lower Palaeolithic as finds from the quarries at Swanscombe attest. The Swanscombe skull, uncovered at Barnfield Pit, a quarry in Swanscombe, is the oldest skull found in Britain. Identified as Homo heidelbergensi ...

History of Lancashire

Lancashire is a county of England, in the northwest of the country. The county did not exist in 1086, for the Domesday Book, and was apparently first created in 1182, making it one of the youngest of the traditional counties. Historic County cons ...

History of Leicestershire

The first recorded use of the name Lægrecastrescir was in 1087. In Domesday Book 1087 the county is recorded as Ledecestrescire and in 1124 Leþecæstrescir occurs. In 1974 due to the local government act 1972, the County of Rutland was annexed to ...

History of Lincolnshire

Lincolnshire, England derived from the merging of the territory of the ancient Kingdom of Lindsey with that controlled by the Danelaw borough Stamford. For some time the entire county was called Lindsey, and it is recorded as such in the Domesday ...

History of Norfolk

Norfolk is a rural county in the East of England. Knowledge of prehistoric Norfolk is limited by a lack of evidence - although the earliest finds are from the end of the Lower Paleolithic period. Communities have existed in Norfolk since the last ...

History of Northamptonshire

Much of Northamptonshires countryside appears to have remained somewhat intractable with regards to early human occupation, resulting in an apparently sparse population and relatively few finds from the Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic peri ...

History of Northumberland

Northumberland, Englands northernmost county, is a land where Roman occupiers once guarded a walled frontier, Anglian invaders fought with Celtic natives, and Norman lords built castles to suppress rebellion and defend a contested border with Sco ...

History of Nottinghamshire

The earliest Teutonic settlers in the district which is now Nottinghamshire were an Anglian tribe who, not later than the 5th century, advanced from Lincolnshire along the Fosseway, and, pushing their way up the Trent valley, settled in the ferti ...

History of Oxfordshire

The county of Oxfordshire in England was formed in the early years of the 10th century and is broadly situated in the land between the River Thames to the south, the Cotswolds to the west, the Chilterns to the east and The Midlands to the north, ...

History of Rutland

The history of the English county of Rutland, located in the East Midlands. It was reconstituted as a district of Leicestershire in 1974 by the Local Government Act 1972. This district was given unitary authority status on 1 April 1997.

History of Shropshire

Shropshire was established during the division of Saxon Mercia into shires in the 10th century. It is first mentioned in 1006. After the Norman Conquest it experienced significant development, following the granting of the principal estates of th ...

History of Somerset

Somerset is a historic county in the south west of England. There is evidence of human occupation since prehistoric times with hand axes and flint points from the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic eras, and a range of burial mounds, hill forts and othe ...

History of Staffordshire

Staffordshire is a landlocked county in the West Midlands of England. It adjoins Cheshire to the north west, Derbyshire and Leicestershire to the east, Warwickshire to the south east, West Midlands and Worcestershire to the south, and Shropshire ...

History of Suffolk

The county of Suffolk was formed from the south part of the kingdom of East Anglia which had been settled by the Angles in the latter half of the 5th century. The most important Anglo-Saxon settlements appear to have been made at Sudbury and Ipsw ...

History of Warwickshire

This is about the history of the county Warwickshire situated in the English Midlands. Historically, bounded to the north-west by Staffordshire, by Leicestershire to the north-east, Northamptonshire to the east, Worcestershire to the west, Oxford ...

History of Wiltshire

The English conquest of the district now known as Wiltshire began in 552 AD with the victory of Saxon Cynric over the native Britons at Old Sarum, by which the way was opened to Salisbury Plain. Four years later, pushing his way through the Vale ...

History of Worcestershire

The area now known as Worcestershire has had human presence since over half a million years ago. Interrupted by two ice ages, Worcestershire has had continuous settlement since roughly 10.000 years ago. In the Iron Age, the area was dominated by ...

History of Yorkshire

Yorkshire is a historic county of England, centred on the county town of York. The region was first occupied after the retreat of the ice age around 8000 BC. During the first millennium AD it was occupied by Romans, Angles and Vikings. The name c ...

Aberdeen Corporation Tramways

The citys tram system was the most northerly municipal tramway in the United Kingdom. From 1906 to 1918 the system fell under the care of R. S, Pilcher who served as General Manager and Chief Engineer. The system was electrified, with trams using ...

Aberdeen Poorhouses

Like most cities and towns across Scotland, Aberdeen and its twin city of Old Aberdeen had Poorhouses to complement the provision for the poor and need provided by the Church, the merchants and the Trades. A Poor Hospital was founded in 1741. Thi ...

Common Good Fund

Aberdeens Common Good Fund is a fund to benefit the people of Aberdeen, Scotland. It was created as a result of Robert the Bruce granting the cities Great Charter in 1319, after they sheltered him during his days of outlaw. In 2005, the value of ...

History of Aberdeen F.C.

Aberdeen Football Club are one of Scotlands most successful football teams and have the distinction of never having been relegated. Among clubs which have been playing in the senior Scottish leagues for more than 20 years, only Celtic and Rangers ...

Seven Incorporated Trades of Aberdeen

Seven Incorporated Trades of Aberdeen is an ancient society of craftsmen in Aberdeen, Scotland. Their home is Trinity Hall on the citys Holburn Street.

Auld Bourtreebush

Auld Bourtreebush is a prehistoric stone circle in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. This megalithic construction is situated near the Causey Mounth ancient trackway, which connects the Scottish lowlands to the highlands. This scheduled ancient monuments.

Barony of Cowie

The Barony of Cowie is a geographical and political division of land in Aberdeenshire, Scotland deriving from the Middle Ages. King Robert the Bruce conferred these lands of the Barony of Cowie, along with the Barony of Cluny and the Barony of Ki ...

Coull Castle

The castle occupies an important and commanding position along the northern approach to Aboyne. Built by the Durwards in the 13th century and was the main stronghold of the barony of O’Neill. The last mention of the intact castle was in a charter ...

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie in north-east Scotland, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It stands on a gentle hill slop ...

Kinord Castle

Kinord Castle, also known as Loch Kinord Castle, was a 14th-century castle on Castle Island in Loch Kinord to the south of Old Kinord, Aberdeenshire, Scotland.

Lonmay Castle

The remains of the Castle of Lonmay are found near Netherton of Lonmay, to the north of Loch Strathbeg in Buchan, Scotland. The remains are not located in the modern village of Lonmay which is approximately 6km to the south west. It was described ...

Migvie Castle

The castle occupies an important and commanding position along the old north road leading from Aboyne to Strathdon. First mentioned in a charter in 1268 by Uilleam, Earl of Mar, the castle was the seat of the Lord of Cromar and caput of the baron ...

Ravenscraig Castle, Aberdeenshire

Ravenscraig Castle, also known as the Craig of Inverugie, is a ruined 15th-century L-shaped tower-house north-west of Peterhead, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. It is a scheduled ancient monument. The castle was the seat of the Barony Torthorston, belon ...

Airlie Parish Kirk

Airlie Parish Kirk is a church in Airlie, Angus. It was completed in 1783 and dedicated to St. Meddan. The interior was renovated in 1893. The church contains pre-Reformation relics.

Forfar Castle

The castle was apparently surrounded by water and was used as a royal castle by the Scottish kings Malcolm III, William I and Alexander II. Malcolm used it as a base for raising an army to repel Danish invaders. The castle was surrendered to the ...

Prior of Restenneth

The Prior of Restenneth was the head of the Augustinian canons of Restenneth Priory, Angus. The following is a list of priors and commendators:

RAF Tealing

During the Second World War, the Air Ministry built an aerodrome at Tealing and in March 1942 No. 56 Operational Training Unit OTU was relocated to RAF Tealing from RAF Sutton Bridge in south Lincolnshire, equipped with Hawker Hurricane, Miles Ma ...

West Seaton House

West Seaton House is a listed building of late Regency design, situated approximately one mile to the east of Arbroath in the parish of St. Vigeans, in the county of Angus in Scotland. Prior to 2009 the house was known as West Seaton Farmhouse.